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Indigenous 14C-phenanthrene biodegradation in “pristine” woodland and grassland soils from Norway and United Kingdom

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Indigenous 14C-phenanthrene biodegradation in “pristine” woodland and grassland soils from Norway and United Kingdom. / Okere, Uchechukwu; Schuster, Jasmin; Ogbonnaya, Uchenna; Jones, Kevin Christopher; Semple, Kirk Taylor.

In: Environmental Science: Processes and Impacts, Vol. 19, No. 11, 04.10.2017, p. 1437-1444.

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Okere, Uchechukwu ; Schuster, Jasmin ; Ogbonnaya, Uchenna ; Jones, Kevin Christopher ; Semple, Kirk Taylor. / Indigenous 14C-phenanthrene biodegradation in “pristine” woodland and grassland soils from Norway and United Kingdom. In: Environmental Science: Processes and Impacts. 2017 ; Vol. 19, No. 11. pp. 1437-1444.

Bibtex

@article{b1f54baa7e1c47229d83d36b0198fbe8,
title = "Indigenous 14C-phenanthrene biodegradation in “pristine” woodland and grassland soils from Norway and United Kingdom",
abstract = "In this study, the indigenous microbial mineralisation of 14C-phenanthrene in seven background soils (four from Norwegian woodland and three from the UK (two grasslands and one woodland)) was investigated. ∑PAHs ranged from 16.39 to 285.54 ng g−1 dw soil. Lag phases (time before 14C-phenanthrene mineralisation reached 5%) were longer in all of the Norwegian soils and correlated positively with TOC, but negatively with ∑PAHs and phenanthrene degraders for all soils. 14C-phenanthrene mineralisation in the soils varied due to physicochemical properties. The results show that indigenous microorganisms can adapt to 14C-phenanthrene mineralisation following diffuse PAH contamination. Considering the potential of soil as a secondary PAH source, these findings highlight the important role of indigenous microflora in the processing of PAHs in the environment.",
author = "Uchechukwu Okere and Jasmin Schuster and Uchenna Ogbonnaya and Jones, {Kevin Christopher} and Semple, {Kirk Taylor}",
year = "2017",
month = oct,
day = "4",
doi = "10.1039/C7EM00242D",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
pages = "1437--1444",
journal = "Environmental Science: Processes and Impacts",
issn = "2050-7887",
publisher = "Royal Society of Chemistry",
number = "11",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Indigenous 14C-phenanthrene biodegradation in “pristine” woodland and grassland soils from Norway and United Kingdom

AU - Okere, Uchechukwu

AU - Schuster, Jasmin

AU - Ogbonnaya, Uchenna

AU - Jones, Kevin Christopher

AU - Semple, Kirk Taylor

PY - 2017/10/4

Y1 - 2017/10/4

N2 - In this study, the indigenous microbial mineralisation of 14C-phenanthrene in seven background soils (four from Norwegian woodland and three from the UK (two grasslands and one woodland)) was investigated. ∑PAHs ranged from 16.39 to 285.54 ng g−1 dw soil. Lag phases (time before 14C-phenanthrene mineralisation reached 5%) were longer in all of the Norwegian soils and correlated positively with TOC, but negatively with ∑PAHs and phenanthrene degraders for all soils. 14C-phenanthrene mineralisation in the soils varied due to physicochemical properties. The results show that indigenous microorganisms can adapt to 14C-phenanthrene mineralisation following diffuse PAH contamination. Considering the potential of soil as a secondary PAH source, these findings highlight the important role of indigenous microflora in the processing of PAHs in the environment.

AB - In this study, the indigenous microbial mineralisation of 14C-phenanthrene in seven background soils (four from Norwegian woodland and three from the UK (two grasslands and one woodland)) was investigated. ∑PAHs ranged from 16.39 to 285.54 ng g−1 dw soil. Lag phases (time before 14C-phenanthrene mineralisation reached 5%) were longer in all of the Norwegian soils and correlated positively with TOC, but negatively with ∑PAHs and phenanthrene degraders for all soils. 14C-phenanthrene mineralisation in the soils varied due to physicochemical properties. The results show that indigenous microorganisms can adapt to 14C-phenanthrene mineralisation following diffuse PAH contamination. Considering the potential of soil as a secondary PAH source, these findings highlight the important role of indigenous microflora in the processing of PAHs in the environment.

U2 - 10.1039/C7EM00242D

DO - 10.1039/C7EM00242D

M3 - Journal article

VL - 19

SP - 1437

EP - 1444

JO - Environmental Science: Processes and Impacts

JF - Environmental Science: Processes and Impacts

SN - 2050-7887

IS - 11

ER -