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Language style matching and police interrogation outcomes

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Language style matching and police interrogation outcomes. / Richardson, Beth; Taylor, Paul J.; Snook, Brent; Conchie, Stacey; Bennell, Craig.

In: Law and Human Behavior, Vol. 38, No. 4, 08.2014, p. 357-366.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

Richardson, B, Taylor, PJ, Snook, B, Conchie, S & Bennell, C 2014, 'Language style matching and police interrogation outcomes', Law and Human Behavior, vol. 38, no. 4, pp. 357-366. https://doi.org/10.1037/lhb0000077

APA

Richardson, B., Taylor, P. J., Snook, B., Conchie, S., & Bennell, C. (2014). Language style matching and police interrogation outcomes. Law and Human Behavior, 38(4), 357-366. https://doi.org/10.1037/lhb0000077

Vancouver

Richardson B, Taylor PJ, Snook B, Conchie S, Bennell C. Language style matching and police interrogation outcomes. Law and Human Behavior. 2014 Aug;38(4):357-366. https://doi.org/10.1037/lhb0000077

Author

Richardson, Beth ; Taylor, Paul J. ; Snook, Brent ; Conchie, Stacey ; Bennell, Craig. / Language style matching and police interrogation outcomes. In: Law and Human Behavior. 2014 ; Vol. 38, No. 4. pp. 357-366.

Bibtex

@article{b955130c8893443d94e67db1e5b8a0bb,
title = "Language style matching and police interrogation outcomes",
abstract = "This research examined the coordination of interrogator and suspects{\textquoteright} verbal behavior in interrogations. Sixty-four police interrogations were examined at the aggregate and utterance level using a measure of verbal mimicry known as Language Style Matching. Analyses revealed an interaction between confession and the direction of language matching. Interrogations containing a confession were characterized by higher rates of the suspect matching the interrogators{\textquoteright} language style than interrogations without a confession. A sequence analysis of utterance-level Language Style Matching revealed a divergence in the type of matching that occurred across outcome. There was a linear increase in interrogator-led matching for interrogations containing a confession and an increase in suspect-led matching for nonconfession interrogations. These findings suggest that police interrogations play out, in part, at the basic level of language coordination.",
author = "Beth Richardson and Taylor, {Paul J.} and Brent Snook and Stacey Conchie and Craig Bennell",
year = "2014",
month = aug
doi = "10.1037/lhb0000077",
language = "English",
volume = "38",
pages = "357--366",
journal = "Law and Human Behavior",
issn = "0147-7307",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Language style matching and police interrogation outcomes

AU - Richardson, Beth

AU - Taylor, Paul J.

AU - Snook, Brent

AU - Conchie, Stacey

AU - Bennell, Craig

PY - 2014/8

Y1 - 2014/8

N2 - This research examined the coordination of interrogator and suspects’ verbal behavior in interrogations. Sixty-four police interrogations were examined at the aggregate and utterance level using a measure of verbal mimicry known as Language Style Matching. Analyses revealed an interaction between confession and the direction of language matching. Interrogations containing a confession were characterized by higher rates of the suspect matching the interrogators’ language style than interrogations without a confession. A sequence analysis of utterance-level Language Style Matching revealed a divergence in the type of matching that occurred across outcome. There was a linear increase in interrogator-led matching for interrogations containing a confession and an increase in suspect-led matching for nonconfession interrogations. These findings suggest that police interrogations play out, in part, at the basic level of language coordination.

AB - This research examined the coordination of interrogator and suspects’ verbal behavior in interrogations. Sixty-four police interrogations were examined at the aggregate and utterance level using a measure of verbal mimicry known as Language Style Matching. Analyses revealed an interaction between confession and the direction of language matching. Interrogations containing a confession were characterized by higher rates of the suspect matching the interrogators’ language style than interrogations without a confession. A sequence analysis of utterance-level Language Style Matching revealed a divergence in the type of matching that occurred across outcome. There was a linear increase in interrogator-led matching for interrogations containing a confession and an increase in suspect-led matching for nonconfession interrogations. These findings suggest that police interrogations play out, in part, at the basic level of language coordination.

U2 - 10.1037/lhb0000077

DO - 10.1037/lhb0000077

M3 - Journal article

VL - 38

SP - 357

EP - 366

JO - Law and Human Behavior

JF - Law and Human Behavior

SN - 0147-7307

IS - 4

ER -