Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Loss of Angiotensin-converting enzyme-related (...

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Loss of Angiotensin-converting enzyme-related (ACER) peptidase disrupts night-time sleep in adult Drosophila melanogaster

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published

Standard

Loss of Angiotensin-converting enzyme-related (ACER) peptidase disrupts night-time sleep in adult Drosophila melanogaster. / Carhan, Ahmet; Tang, Ke; Shirras, Christine A.; Shirras, Alan D.; Isaac, R. Elwyn.

In: Journal of Experimental Biology, Vol. 214, No. 4, 02.2011, p. 680-686.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

APA

Vancouver

Author

Carhan, Ahmet ; Tang, Ke ; Shirras, Christine A. ; Shirras, Alan D. ; Isaac, R. Elwyn. / Loss of Angiotensin-converting enzyme-related (ACER) peptidase disrupts night-time sleep in adult Drosophila melanogaster. In: Journal of Experimental Biology. 2011 ; Vol. 214, No. 4. pp. 680-686.

Bibtex

@article{4c83d6862cc048ff942945bc05aea9c7,
title = "Loss of Angiotensin-converting enzyme-related (ACER) peptidase disrupts night-time sleep in adult Drosophila melanogaster",
abstract = "Drosophila Acer (Angiotensin-converting enzyme-related) encodes a member of the angiotensin-converting enzyme family of metallopeptidases that have important roles in the endocrine regulation of blood homeostasis in mammals. Acer is expressed in the embryonic heart of Drosophila and expression in the adult head appears to be regulated by two clock genes. To study the role of Acer in development and in circadian activity, we have generated Acer null mutants by imprecise excision of a P-element and have compared their development and circadian behaviour with that of wild-type flies with the same genetic background. We show that Acer is not required for normal development, but that night sleep, which is clock regulated, is disrupted in adult flies lacking ACER. Acer null adults have reduced night-time sleep and greater sleep fragmentation, but normal levels of daytime sleep. The quality of night sleep in flies fed inhibitors of ACER is affected in a very similar manner. We have shown, using specific antibodies, that ACER is present in the adult fat body of the head and abdomen, and is secreted into the haemolymph. ACER might therefore have a role in cleaving regulatory peptides involved in metabolism and activity behaviour. There are similarities with mammals, where ACE peptidases are also expressed in adipose tissue and are thought to be part of a signalling system linking metabolism with sleep.",
keywords = "angiotensin-converting enzyme, development, sleep quality, Drosophila melanogaster, sleep fragmentation, GENETICALLY-MODIFIED MICE, INSECT FAT-BODY, BLOOD-PRESSURE, ALDOSTERONE SYSTEM, METABOLIC SYNDROME, MALE-FERTILITY, GENE, ANGIOTENSIN-CONVERTING-ENZYME-2, EXPRESSION, INSIGHTS",
author = "Ahmet Carhan and Ke Tang and Shirras, {Christine A.} and Shirras, {Alan D.} and Isaac, {R. Elwyn}",
year = "2011",
month = feb,
doi = "10.1242/jeb.049353",
language = "English",
volume = "214",
pages = "680--686",
journal = "Journal of Experimental Biology",
issn = "0022-0949",
publisher = "Company of Biologists Ltd",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Loss of Angiotensin-converting enzyme-related (ACER) peptidase disrupts night-time sleep in adult Drosophila melanogaster

AU - Carhan, Ahmet

AU - Tang, Ke

AU - Shirras, Christine A.

AU - Shirras, Alan D.

AU - Isaac, R. Elwyn

PY - 2011/2

Y1 - 2011/2

N2 - Drosophila Acer (Angiotensin-converting enzyme-related) encodes a member of the angiotensin-converting enzyme family of metallopeptidases that have important roles in the endocrine regulation of blood homeostasis in mammals. Acer is expressed in the embryonic heart of Drosophila and expression in the adult head appears to be regulated by two clock genes. To study the role of Acer in development and in circadian activity, we have generated Acer null mutants by imprecise excision of a P-element and have compared their development and circadian behaviour with that of wild-type flies with the same genetic background. We show that Acer is not required for normal development, but that night sleep, which is clock regulated, is disrupted in adult flies lacking ACER. Acer null adults have reduced night-time sleep and greater sleep fragmentation, but normal levels of daytime sleep. The quality of night sleep in flies fed inhibitors of ACER is affected in a very similar manner. We have shown, using specific antibodies, that ACER is present in the adult fat body of the head and abdomen, and is secreted into the haemolymph. ACER might therefore have a role in cleaving regulatory peptides involved in metabolism and activity behaviour. There are similarities with mammals, where ACE peptidases are also expressed in adipose tissue and are thought to be part of a signalling system linking metabolism with sleep.

AB - Drosophila Acer (Angiotensin-converting enzyme-related) encodes a member of the angiotensin-converting enzyme family of metallopeptidases that have important roles in the endocrine regulation of blood homeostasis in mammals. Acer is expressed in the embryonic heart of Drosophila and expression in the adult head appears to be regulated by two clock genes. To study the role of Acer in development and in circadian activity, we have generated Acer null mutants by imprecise excision of a P-element and have compared their development and circadian behaviour with that of wild-type flies with the same genetic background. We show that Acer is not required for normal development, but that night sleep, which is clock regulated, is disrupted in adult flies lacking ACER. Acer null adults have reduced night-time sleep and greater sleep fragmentation, but normal levels of daytime sleep. The quality of night sleep in flies fed inhibitors of ACER is affected in a very similar manner. We have shown, using specific antibodies, that ACER is present in the adult fat body of the head and abdomen, and is secreted into the haemolymph. ACER might therefore have a role in cleaving regulatory peptides involved in metabolism and activity behaviour. There are similarities with mammals, where ACE peptidases are also expressed in adipose tissue and are thought to be part of a signalling system linking metabolism with sleep.

KW - angiotensin-converting enzyme

KW - development

KW - sleep quality

KW - Drosophila melanogaster

KW - sleep fragmentation

KW - GENETICALLY-MODIFIED MICE

KW - INSECT FAT-BODY

KW - BLOOD-PRESSURE

KW - ALDOSTERONE SYSTEM

KW - METABOLIC SYNDROME

KW - MALE-FERTILITY

KW - GENE

KW - ANGIOTENSIN-CONVERTING-ENZYME-2

KW - EXPRESSION

KW - INSIGHTS

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79951500065&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1242/jeb.049353

DO - 10.1242/jeb.049353

M3 - Journal article

VL - 214

SP - 680

EP - 686

JO - Journal of Experimental Biology

JF - Journal of Experimental Biology

SN - 0022-0949

IS - 4

ER -