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    Rights statement: © Junction Publishing, 2017. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive Version of Record was published in EWSN ’17 Proceedings of the 2017 International Conference on Embedded Wireless Systems and Networks

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Mitigating Inter-Network Interference in LoRa Networks

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Publication date20/02/2017
Host publicationEWSN ’17 Proceedings of the 2017 International Conference on Embedded Wireless Systems and Networks
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherACM Press
Pages323-328
Number of pages6
ISBN (Print)9780994988614
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Long Range (LoRa) is a popular technology used to construct Low-Power Wide-Area Network (LPWAN) networks. Given the popularity of LoRa it is likely that multiple independent LoRa networks are deployed in close proximity. In this situation, neighbouring networks interfere and methods have to be found to combat this interference. In this paper we investigate the use of directional antennae and the use of multiple base stations as methods of dealing with inter-network interference. Directional antennae increase signal strength at receivers without increasing transmission energy cost. Thus, the probability of successfully decoding the message in an interference situation is improved. Multiple base stations can alternatively be used to improve the probability of receiving a message in a noisy environment. We compare the effectiveness of these two approaches via simulation. Our findings show that both methods are able to improve LoRa network performance in interference settings. However, the results show that the use of multiple base stations clearly outperforms the use of directional antennae. For example, in a setting where data is collected from 600 nodes which are interfered by four networks with 600 nodes each, using three base stations improves the Data Extraction Rate (DER) from 0.24 to 0.56 while the use of directional antennae provides an increase to only 0.32.

Bibliographic note

© Junction Publishing, 2017. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive Version of Record was published in EWSN ’17 Proceedings of the 2017 International Conference on Embedded Wireless Systems and Networks