Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > ‘Mixing’ and ‘Bending’

Electronic data

  • Discourse and Communication paper by Zappettini and Unerman

    Rights statement: The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Discourse and Communication, 10 (5), 2016, © SAGE Publications Ltd, 2016 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Discourse and Communication page: http://journals.sagepub.com/home/dcm on SAGE Journals Online: http://journals.sagepub.com/

    Accepted author manuscript, 424 KB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

‘Mixing’ and ‘Bending’: The recontextualisation of discourses of sustainability in integrated reporting

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>10/2016
<mark>Journal</mark>Discourse and Communication
Issue number5
Volume10
Number of pages22
Pages (from-to)521-542
Publication statusPublished
Early online date4/08/16
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Since their emergence, discourses of sustainability have been widely resemioticised in different genres and have intertextually merged with other discourses and practices. This article examines the emergence of Integrated Reporting (IR) as a new hybrid genre in which, along with financial information, organisations may choose to report the social and environmental impacts of their activities in one single document. Specifically, this article analyses a selected sample of IRs produced by early adopters to explore how discourses of sustainability have been recontextualised into financial and economic macro discourses and how different intertextual/interdiscursive relations have played out in linguistic constructions of ‘sustainability’. We contend that, by and large, the term sustainability has been appropriated, mixed with other discourses and semantically ‘bent’ to construct the organisation itself as being financially sustainable, that is, viable and profitable and for the primary benefit of shareholders. From this stance, we argue that, through the hybridity of IR, most companies have primarily colonised discourses of sustainability for the rhetorical purpose of self-legitimation. © 2016, © The Author(s) 2016.

Bibliographic note

The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Discourse and Communication, 10 (5), 2016, © SAGE Publications Ltd, 2016 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Discourse and Communication page: http://journals.sagepub.com/home/dcm on SAGE Journals Online: http://journals.sagepub.com/