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Motivational factors in computer-administered integrated skills tasks: A study of young learners

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Motivational factors in computer-administered integrated skills tasks : A study of young learners. / Kormos, Judit; Brunfaut, Tineke; Michel, Marije.

In: Language Assessment Quarterly, Vol. 17, No. 1, 01.01.2020, p. 43-59.

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@article{dfb66deb5c2b49e9aa400af6b3aa4c4b,
title = "Motivational factors in computer-administered integrated skills tasks: A study of young learners",
abstract = "Previous studies examined the association between motivational characteristics and language learning achievement, but considerably less is known about young language learners{\textquoteright} task-specific motivation in assessment contexts. Our study investigated the task motivation of young learners of English when completing computer-administered integrated test tasks, and the relationship between task performance and test task motivation. Hundred and four learners aged between 11 and 15 years completed three computer-administered assessment tasks: a Listen-Write task, which required a summary of a listening text, and two Listen-Speak tasks, in which learners had to retell a listening text with academic and non-academic content, respectively. Participants also filled in a task-motivation questionnaire, containing items on appraisals of task difficulty, task-related emotions and anxiety, effort and subjective competence. The results indicated that the young learners held positive views on the integrated assessment tasks. Nevertheless, they found the Listen-Speak tasks significantly more difficult, more anxiety-provoking and less enjoyable than the Listen-Write task and they judged their competence to be lower than in the Listen-Write task. Task-motivational factors accounted for a low level of variation in task performance. These findings have important implications for the design and use of computer-administered integrated tasks in assessing young L2 learners.",
keywords = "motivation, integrated testing, young learners",
author = "Judit Kormos and Tineke Brunfaut and Marije Michel",
year = "2020",
month = jan
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/15434303.2019.1664551",
language = "English",
volume = "17",
pages = "43--59",
journal = "Language Assessment Quarterly",
issn = "1543-4303",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Motivational factors in computer-administered integrated skills tasks

T2 - A study of young learners

AU - Kormos, Judit

AU - Brunfaut, Tineke

AU - Michel, Marije

PY - 2020/1/1

Y1 - 2020/1/1

N2 - Previous studies examined the association between motivational characteristics and language learning achievement, but considerably less is known about young language learners’ task-specific motivation in assessment contexts. Our study investigated the task motivation of young learners of English when completing computer-administered integrated test tasks, and the relationship between task performance and test task motivation. Hundred and four learners aged between 11 and 15 years completed three computer-administered assessment tasks: a Listen-Write task, which required a summary of a listening text, and two Listen-Speak tasks, in which learners had to retell a listening text with academic and non-academic content, respectively. Participants also filled in a task-motivation questionnaire, containing items on appraisals of task difficulty, task-related emotions and anxiety, effort and subjective competence. The results indicated that the young learners held positive views on the integrated assessment tasks. Nevertheless, they found the Listen-Speak tasks significantly more difficult, more anxiety-provoking and less enjoyable than the Listen-Write task and they judged their competence to be lower than in the Listen-Write task. Task-motivational factors accounted for a low level of variation in task performance. These findings have important implications for the design and use of computer-administered integrated tasks in assessing young L2 learners.

AB - Previous studies examined the association between motivational characteristics and language learning achievement, but considerably less is known about young language learners’ task-specific motivation in assessment contexts. Our study investigated the task motivation of young learners of English when completing computer-administered integrated test tasks, and the relationship between task performance and test task motivation. Hundred and four learners aged between 11 and 15 years completed three computer-administered assessment tasks: a Listen-Write task, which required a summary of a listening text, and two Listen-Speak tasks, in which learners had to retell a listening text with academic and non-academic content, respectively. Participants also filled in a task-motivation questionnaire, containing items on appraisals of task difficulty, task-related emotions and anxiety, effort and subjective competence. The results indicated that the young learners held positive views on the integrated assessment tasks. Nevertheless, they found the Listen-Speak tasks significantly more difficult, more anxiety-provoking and less enjoyable than the Listen-Write task and they judged their competence to be lower than in the Listen-Write task. Task-motivational factors accounted for a low level of variation in task performance. These findings have important implications for the design and use of computer-administered integrated tasks in assessing young L2 learners.

KW - motivation

KW - integrated testing

KW - young learners

U2 - 10.1080/15434303.2019.1664551

DO - 10.1080/15434303.2019.1664551

M3 - Journal article

VL - 17

SP - 43

EP - 59

JO - Language Assessment Quarterly

JF - Language Assessment Quarterly

SN - 1543-4303

IS - 1

ER -