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    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Language and Education on 10/04/2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/09500782.2017.1302466

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Negotiating citizenship: a young child’s collaborative meaning-making constructions of beavers as a symbol of Canada

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Negotiating citizenship : a young child’s collaborative meaning-making constructions of beavers as a symbol of Canada. / Gillen, J ; Cameron, Catherine Ann.

In: Language and Education, Vol. 31, No. 4, 06.05.2017, p. 330-350.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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Gillen, J ; Cameron, Catherine Ann. / Negotiating citizenship : a young child’s collaborative meaning-making constructions of beavers as a symbol of Canada. In: Language and Education. 2017 ; Vol. 31, No. 4. pp. 330-350.

Bibtex

@article{2f8c6335e9b64284b3192115fc96d39b,
title = "Negotiating citizenship: a young child{\textquoteright}s collaborative meaning-making constructions of beavers as a symbol of Canada",
abstract = "The right to share the social heritage of a nation is an element of citizenship closely associated with education (Marshall [1950]1992). Social heritage is understood as the negotiation of understandings within a dialectical understanding of social practice across multiple timescales. In this paper the meaning-making practices of one young child concerned with beavers as symbols of Canada is studied, using the Day in the Life methodology (Gillen, Cameron, et.al.), across two encounters in one day, the first in {\textquoteleft}mat time{\textquoteright} at a kindergarten and the second at afternoon tea with her family. The teacher{\textquoteright}s careful orchestration of the event is analysed, and elements of her structuring of heteroglossic discourses identified. Suhani both demonstrates close attention to certain complexities in her subsequent family dialogues and expands her narrative with imagined additional elements. The paper contributes to our understanding of bridging between the early development of academic discourse registers and home-based narratives (Gallagher 2016). Methodologically, a contribution is made to consideration of processes of transcription, for analytic and dissemination purposes. In conclusion, deepening linguistic ethnography through the use of multimodal methods, we find, with Pagani (2009, 92), {\textquoteleft}complexes of representations and practices{\textquoteright} in the negotiation of citizenship through daily life routines. ",
keywords = "literacy, multimodality, early childhood, CITIZENSHIP",
author = "J Gillen and Cameron, {Catherine Ann}",
note = "This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor and Francis in Language and Education on 10/04/2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/09500782.2017.1302466",
year = "2017",
month = may
day = "6",
doi = "10.1080/09500782.2017.1302466",
language = "English",
volume = "31",
pages = "330--350",
journal = "Language and Education",
issn = "0950-0782",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Negotiating citizenship

T2 - a young child’s collaborative meaning-making constructions of beavers as a symbol of Canada

AU - Gillen, J

AU - Cameron, Catherine Ann

N1 - This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor and Francis in Language and Education on 10/04/2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/09500782.2017.1302466

PY - 2017/5/6

Y1 - 2017/5/6

N2 - The right to share the social heritage of a nation is an element of citizenship closely associated with education (Marshall [1950]1992). Social heritage is understood as the negotiation of understandings within a dialectical understanding of social practice across multiple timescales. In this paper the meaning-making practices of one young child concerned with beavers as symbols of Canada is studied, using the Day in the Life methodology (Gillen, Cameron, et.al.), across two encounters in one day, the first in ‘mat time’ at a kindergarten and the second at afternoon tea with her family. The teacher’s careful orchestration of the event is analysed, and elements of her structuring of heteroglossic discourses identified. Suhani both demonstrates close attention to certain complexities in her subsequent family dialogues and expands her narrative with imagined additional elements. The paper contributes to our understanding of bridging between the early development of academic discourse registers and home-based narratives (Gallagher 2016). Methodologically, a contribution is made to consideration of processes of transcription, for analytic and dissemination purposes. In conclusion, deepening linguistic ethnography through the use of multimodal methods, we find, with Pagani (2009, 92), ‘complexes of representations and practices’ in the negotiation of citizenship through daily life routines.

AB - The right to share the social heritage of a nation is an element of citizenship closely associated with education (Marshall [1950]1992). Social heritage is understood as the negotiation of understandings within a dialectical understanding of social practice across multiple timescales. In this paper the meaning-making practices of one young child concerned with beavers as symbols of Canada is studied, using the Day in the Life methodology (Gillen, Cameron, et.al.), across two encounters in one day, the first in ‘mat time’ at a kindergarten and the second at afternoon tea with her family. The teacher’s careful orchestration of the event is analysed, and elements of her structuring of heteroglossic discourses identified. Suhani both demonstrates close attention to certain complexities in her subsequent family dialogues and expands her narrative with imagined additional elements. The paper contributes to our understanding of bridging between the early development of academic discourse registers and home-based narratives (Gallagher 2016). Methodologically, a contribution is made to consideration of processes of transcription, for analytic and dissemination purposes. In conclusion, deepening linguistic ethnography through the use of multimodal methods, we find, with Pagani (2009, 92), ‘complexes of representations and practices’ in the negotiation of citizenship through daily life routines.

KW - literacy

KW - multimodality

KW - early childhood

KW - CITIZENSHIP

U2 - 10.1080/09500782.2017.1302466

DO - 10.1080/09500782.2017.1302466

M3 - Journal article

VL - 31

SP - 330

EP - 350

JO - Language and Education

JF - Language and Education

SN - 0950-0782

IS - 4

ER -