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  • Not on Demand, Internet of Things enabled Energy Temporality

    Rights statement: © ACM, 2017. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive Version of Record was published in DIS '17 Companion Proceedings of the 2016 ACM Conference Companion Publication on Designing Interactive Systems http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/3064857.3079112

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Not On Demand: Internet of Things Enabled Energy Temporality

Research output: Contribution in Book/Report/Proceedings - With ISBN/ISSNPaper

Published
Publication date12/06/2017
Host publicationDIS '17 Companion Proceedings of the 2016 ACM Conference Companion Publication on Designing Interactive Systems
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherACM
Pages23-27
Number of pages5
ISBN (Electronic)9781450349918
Original languageEnglish
EventDIS '17 - The Assembly Rooms, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Duration: 10/06/201714/06/2017
http://dis2017.org/

Conference

ConferenceDIS '17
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityEdinburgh
Period10/06/1714/06/17
Internet address

Conference

ConferenceDIS '17
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityEdinburgh
Period10/06/1714/06/17
Internet address

Abstract

Over a century ago alternating current (AC) triumphed over direct current (DC) in the ‘war of the currents’ and ever since AC has been ubiquitous. Increasingly devices operating internally use DC power, hence inefficient conversions from AC to DC are necessarily common. Conversely, domestic photovoltaic (PV) panels produce DC current which must be inverted to AC to integrate with existing wiring, appliances, and/or be exported the power grid. By using batteries, specifically designed DC devices, and the Internet of Things, our infrastructure may be redesigned to improve efficiency. In this provocation, we use design fiction to describe how such a system could be implemented and to open a discussion about the broader implications of such a technological shift on user experience design and interaction design.

Bibliographic note

© ACM, 2017. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive Version of Record was published in DIS '17 Companion Proceedings of the 2016 ACM Conference Companion Publication on Designing Interactive Systems http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/3064857.3079112