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    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Mental Health, Religion and Culture on 3/6/2019, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13674676.2019.1601171

    Accepted author manuscript, 862 KB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 3/06/20

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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Positive aspects of voice-hearing: a qualitative metasynthesis

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>30/06/2019
<mark>Journal</mark>Mental Health, Religion and Culture
Issue number2
Volume22
Number of pages18
Pages (from-to)208-225
Publication statusPublished
Early online date3/06/19
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Voice-hearing occurs in clinical and non-clinical samples, and the role of spiritual and cultural frameworks of understanding for percipients has received increased attention. This review aimed to identify and synthesise the existing qualitative literature relating to positive aspects of voice-hearing experiences, and to make recommendations based on these findings for clinical practice and future research. Qualitative papers that included positive aspects of voice-hearing were identified by undertaking a systematic search of six electronic databases, resulting in 22 papers. The quality of each paper was assessed and the meta-ethnographic approach was used to extract and synthesise the data. Six themes were identified relating to voices providing safety and protection, guidance, creating psychological and emotional well-being, providing companionship, facilitating personal growth and development, and connecting hearers to religious or spiritual belief systems. The findings suggest positive aspects of voice-hearing that may have clinical and research implications.

Bibliographic note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Mental Health, Religion and Culture on 3/6/2019, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13674676.2019.1601171