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  • JARID Postural Care Accepted Version

    Rights statement: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article:Robertson J, Baines S, Emerson E, and Hatton C. Postural care for people with intellectual disabilities and severely impaired motor function: A scoping review. J Appl Res Intellect Disabil. 2018;31(Suppl. 1):11–28. doi: 10.1111/jar.12325 which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jar.12325/abstract This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.

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    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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Postural care for people with intellectual disabilities and severely impaired motor function: a scoping review

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>01/2018
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities
Issue numberSuppl. 1
Volume31
Number of pages18
Pages (from-to)11-28
Publication statusPublished
Early online date22/12/16
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Background

Poor postural care can have severe and life-threatening complications. This scoping review aims to map and summarize existing evidence regarding postural care for people with intellectual disabilities and severely impaired motor function.
Method

Studies were identified via electronic database searches (MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Web of Science) covering January 1990 to March 2016, and email requests to researcher networks. Results were collated via descriptive numerical summary of studies and thematic analysis.
Results

Twenty-three studies were identified and summarized narratively in relation to three themes: characteristics and prevalence, interventions and service related issues. The evidence base is small with significant gaps. Lack of evidence for night-time positioning equipment and 24-hr postural care needs to be addressed urgently.
Conclusion

Future research should be clearly directed towards ascertaining how best postural care interventions can be employed to help improve the health and quality of life of people with intellectual disabilities.

Bibliographic note

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article:Robertson J, Baines S, Emerson E, and Hatton C. Postural care for people with intellectual disabilities and severely impaired motor function: A scoping review. J Appl Res Intellect Disabil. 2018;31(Suppl. 1):11–28. doi: 10.1111/jar.12325 which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jar.12325/abstract This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.