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    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Body Image. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Body Image, 27, 2018 DOI: 10.1016/j.bodtim.2018.08.001

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Prosthesis use is associated with reduced physical self-disgust in limb amputees

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>12/2018
<mark>Journal</mark>Body Image
Volume27
Number of pages9
Pages (from-to)109-117
Publication statusPublished
Early online date19/09/18
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Self-disgust is an emotion schema negatively affecting people’s body image and is triggered
by bodily imperfections and deviations from the “normal” body envelope. In this study, we
explore the idea that “normalising” the body in those with limb amputations via the prosthesis
would be linked to reduced self-directed disgust. An international clinical community sample
(N = 83) with mostly lower limb amputations completed measures about their demographics,
prosthesis, adjustment, body image disturbance, psychological distress, and self-directed
disgust in a survey design. Consistent with the “normalising” hypothesis, correlation and
bootstrapped regression models revealed, first, that frequency of prosthesis use was
significantly and negatively associated with physical self-disgust. Second, prosthesis use
significantly mediated the exogenous effect of time since amputation on physical self-disgust.
These results emphasise the psychological value of the prosthesis beyond its functional use,
and stress its importance in normalising the body envelope in those with limb amputations,
which may in turn promote psychological well-being.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Body Image. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Body Image, 27, 2018 DOI: 10.1016/j.bodtim.2018.08.001