Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Quantity and Diversity of Pre-Literacy Language...

Associated organisational unit

Electronic data

  • chang_monaghan_18_ssr

    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Scientific Studies of Reading on 10/10/2018, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10888438.2018.1529177

    Accepted author manuscript, 814 KB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Quantity and Diversity of Pre-Literacy Language Exposure Both Affect Literacy Development: Evidence from a Computational Model of Reading

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>4/05/2019
<mark>Journal</mark>Scientific Studies of Reading
Issue number3
Volume23
Number of pages19
Pages (from-to)235-253
Publication statusPublished
Early online date10/10/18
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Diversity of vocabulary knowledge and quantity of language exposure prior to literacy are key predictors of reading development. However, diversity and quantity of exposure are difficult to distinguish in behavioural studies, and so the causal relations with literacy are not well known. We tested these relations by training a connectionist triangle model of reading that learned to map between semantic, phonological, and, later, orthographic forms of words. The model first learned to map between phonology and semantics, where we manipulated the quantity and diversity of this preliterate language experience. Then the model learned to read. Both diversity and quantity of exposure had unique effects on reading performance, with larger effects for written word comprehension than for reading fluency. The results further showed that quantity of preliteracy language exposure was only beneficial when this was to a varied vocabulary, and could be an impediment when exposed to a limited vocabulary.

Bibliographic note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Scientific Studies of Reading on 10/10/2018, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10888438.2018.1529177