Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Relative likelihood for life as a function of c...

Associated organisational unit

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Relative likelihood for life as a function of cosmic time

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published

Standard

Relative likelihood for life as a function of cosmic time. / Loeb, Abraham; Batista, Rafael A.; Sloan, David.

In: Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics, Vol. 2016, No. 08, 18.08.2016, p. 40.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

Loeb, A, Batista, RA & Sloan, D 2016, 'Relative likelihood for life as a function of cosmic time', Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics, vol. 2016, no. 08, pp. 40. https://doi.org/10.1088/1475-7516/2016/08/040

APA

Loeb, A., Batista, R. A., & Sloan, D. (2016). Relative likelihood for life as a function of cosmic time. Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics, 2016(08), 40. https://doi.org/10.1088/1475-7516/2016/08/040

Vancouver

Loeb A, Batista RA, Sloan D. Relative likelihood for life as a function of cosmic time. Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics. 2016 Aug 18;2016(08):40. https://doi.org/10.1088/1475-7516/2016/08/040

Author

Loeb, Abraham ; Batista, Rafael A. ; Sloan, David. / Relative likelihood for life as a function of cosmic time. In: Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics. 2016 ; Vol. 2016, No. 08. pp. 40.

Bibtex

@article{598204eae18d4a07a61aad415cc5a472,
title = "Relative likelihood for life as a function of cosmic time",
abstract = "Is life most likely to emerge at the present cosmic time near a star like the Sun? We address this question by calculating the relative formation probability per unit time of habitable Earth-like planets within a fixed comoving volume of the Universe, dP(t)/dt, starting from the first stars and continuing to the distant cosmic future. We conservatively restrict our attention to the context of ``life as we know it'' and the standard cosmological model, ΛCDM . We find that unless habitability around low mass stars is suppressed, life is most likely to exist near ∼ 0.1M⊙ stars ten trillion years from now. Spectroscopic searches for biosignatures in the atmospheres of transiting Earth-mass planets around low mass stars will determine whether present-day life is indeed premature or typical from a cosmic perspective.",
author = "Abraham Loeb and Batista, {Rafael A.} and David Sloan",
year = "2016",
month = aug
day = "18",
doi = "10.1088/1475-7516/2016/08/040",
language = "English",
volume = "2016",
pages = "40",
journal = "Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics",
issn = "1475-7516",
publisher = "IOP Publishing",
number = "08",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Relative likelihood for life as a function of cosmic time

AU - Loeb, Abraham

AU - Batista, Rafael A.

AU - Sloan, David

PY - 2016/8/18

Y1 - 2016/8/18

N2 - Is life most likely to emerge at the present cosmic time near a star like the Sun? We address this question by calculating the relative formation probability per unit time of habitable Earth-like planets within a fixed comoving volume of the Universe, dP(t)/dt, starting from the first stars and continuing to the distant cosmic future. We conservatively restrict our attention to the context of ``life as we know it'' and the standard cosmological model, ΛCDM . We find that unless habitability around low mass stars is suppressed, life is most likely to exist near ∼ 0.1M⊙ stars ten trillion years from now. Spectroscopic searches for biosignatures in the atmospheres of transiting Earth-mass planets around low mass stars will determine whether present-day life is indeed premature or typical from a cosmic perspective.

AB - Is life most likely to emerge at the present cosmic time near a star like the Sun? We address this question by calculating the relative formation probability per unit time of habitable Earth-like planets within a fixed comoving volume of the Universe, dP(t)/dt, starting from the first stars and continuing to the distant cosmic future. We conservatively restrict our attention to the context of ``life as we know it'' and the standard cosmological model, ΛCDM . We find that unless habitability around low mass stars is suppressed, life is most likely to exist near ∼ 0.1M⊙ stars ten trillion years from now. Spectroscopic searches for biosignatures in the atmospheres of transiting Earth-mass planets around low mass stars will determine whether present-day life is indeed premature or typical from a cosmic perspective.

U2 - 10.1088/1475-7516/2016/08/040

DO - 10.1088/1475-7516/2016/08/040

M3 - Journal article

VL - 2016

SP - 40

JO - Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics

JF - Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics

SN - 1475-7516

IS - 08

ER -