Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Self-reported smoking, alcohol and drug use amo...

Electronic data

  • JIDD Smoking Alcohol Drug Use Manuscript for PURE

    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability on 23/04/2018, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.3109/13668250.2018.1440773

    Accepted author manuscript, 608 KB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Self-reported smoking, alcohol and drug use among adolescents and young adults with and without mild to moderate intellectual disability

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

E-pub ahead of print
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>23/04/2018
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print
Early online date23/04/18
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Background: People with intellectual disability may be at elevated risk of adverse consequences of substance use. This study outlines the prevalence of, and factors associated with, substance use in young people with and without intellectual disability.

Method: Secondary analysis was undertaken of the Next Steps annual panel study, which follows a cohort through adolescence into adulthood and contains self-report data on smoking, alcohol and drug use.

Results: Young people with mild to moderate intellectual disabilities were generally less likely to use substances than young people without intellectual disabilities. The pattern of association with socio-demographic factors was mixed. Overall, matching participants on between-group differences in exposure to extraneous risk factors did not impact on between-group differences in substance use.

Conclusions: Young people with mild to moderate intellectual disability are less likely to use substances than their non-disabled peers. Prevention and intervention programs need to be adapted for those in this population who do use substances.

Bibliographic note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability on 23/04/2018, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.3109/13668250.2018.1440773