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Social care for adults with learning disabilities in England: trends over time

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>1/04/2019
<mark>Journal</mark>Tizard Learning Disability Review
Issue number2
Volume24
Number of pages7
Pages (from-to)94-100
Publication StatusPublished
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine trends over time in social care usage and expenditure for adults with learning disabilities in England. Design/methodology/approach: Returns from councils with social services responsibilities in England concerning social care usage and expenditure were analysed to examine the national picture and trends over time for adults with learning disabilities. Findings: In 2017/2018, 147,915 adults with learning disabilities were receiving long-term social care, an increase of 5.7 per cent from 2014/2015. Social care expenditure increased by 10.2 per cent from 2014/2015 to £5.54bn in 2017/2018; adjusted for inflation this was a 2.7 per cent increase. For adults with learning disabilities who receive social care, increasing numbers of people are living with families or in supported accommodation/living, with gradual declines in the number of people living in residential or nursing care. The number of adults with learning disabilities in temporary accommodation is small but increasing. Social implications: While councils appear to be attempting to protect social care for adults with learning disabilities in the face of cuts to council expenditure, social care expenditure and coverage are not keeping pace with likely increases in the number of adults with learning disabilities requiring social care. Originality/value: This paper presents in one place statistics concerning long-term social care for adults with learning disabilities in England.