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Testbeam results of irradiated ams H18 HV-CMOS pixel sensor prototypes

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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  • M. Benoit
  • S. Braccini
  • G. Casse
  • H. Chen
  • F. A. Di Bello
  • D. Ferrere
  • T. Golling
  • S. Gonzalez-Sevilla
  • G. Iacobucci
  • M. Kiehn
  • F. Lanni
  • H. Liu
  • L. Meng
  • C. Merlassino
  • A. Miucci
  • M. Nessi
  • H. Okawa
  • I. Perić
  • M. Rimoldi
  • B Ristic
  • M. Vicente Barreto Pinto
  • J. Vossebeld
  • M. Weber
  • T. Weston
  • W. Wu
  • L Xu
  • E. Zaffaroni
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Article numberP02011
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>8/02/2018
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of Instrumentation
Volume13
Number of pages15
<mark>State</mark>Published
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

HV-CMOS pixel sensors are a promising option for the tracker upgrade of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, as well as for other future tracking applications in which large areas are to be instrumented with radiation-tolerant silicon pixel sensors. We present results of testbeam characterisations of the 4th generation of Capacitively Coupled Pixel Detectors (CCPDv4) produced with the ams H18 HV-CMOS process that have been irradiated with different particles (reactor neutrons and 18 MeV protons) to fluences between 1× 1014 and 5× 1015 1−MeV− neq. The sensors were glued to ATLAS FE-I4 pixel readout chips and measured at the CERN SPS H8 beamline using the FE-I4 beam telescope. Results for all fluences are very encouraging with all hit efficiencies being better than 97% for bias voltages of 85 V. The sample irradiated to a fluence of 1× 1015 neq—a relevant value for a large volume of the upgraded tracker—exhibited 99.7% average hit efficiency. The results give strong evidence for the radiation tolerance of HV-CMOS sensors and their suitability as sensors for the experimental HL-LHC upgrades and future large-area silicon-based tracking detectors in high-radiation environments.