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The association between employment status and health among British adults with and without intellectual impairments: cross-sectional analyses of a cohort study

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@article{df6e7da406274e9897a6a971e8ef6c40,
title = "The association between employment status and health among British adults with and without intellectual impairments: cross-sectional analyses of a cohort study",
abstract = "Background: There exists a well established link between employment status and health, with unemployment being associated with poorer health. Much less is known about the association between economic inactivity and health, especially among people with disabilities. Our aim is to determine whether the association between employment status and health is similar for adults with and adults without intellectual impairment.Methods: Using nationally representative data from the 1970 British Cohort Study, we undertook a series of cross sectional analyses of the association between employment status and health (self-reported general health, mental health) among British adults with and without intellectual impairments at ages 26, 30, 34, 38 and 42.Results: People with intellectual disability and borderline intellectual functioning had markedly lower employment rates and poorer health than other participants at all waves of data collection. When compared with participants in full-time employment the prevalence of poorer self rated health and mental health was higher among participants with and without intellectual impairment who were in either part-time employment or were economically inactive at all ages. When compared with participants in employment the prevalence of poorer self rated health and mental health was higher among participants with and without intellectual impairment who were in the economically inactive categories of unemployment, education/training and ill/disabled at all ages. Intellectual disability status appeared to moderate the strength of the relationship between economic activity and self-rated health and, to a much lesser extent, the relationship between economic activity and mental health. In all instances the moderation indicated a stronger association among participants without intellectual impairment.Conclusions: The results provide substantive evidence to suggest that the nature of the well-established association between employment and better health is similar for British adults with and without intellectual impairments. The results do, however, indicate that the magnitude of the effect involved differed. Further research is needed to identify mechanisms that may underlie this difference.",
keywords = "Employment, Health, Intellectual disability, Intellectual impairment, Borderline intellectual functioning, Cognitive ability, HOUSEHOLD PANEL SURVEY, SELF-RATED HEALTH, PAID EMPLOYMENT, MENTAL-HEALTH, ILL HEALTH, TRANSITIONS, POPULATION, PARTICIPATION, UNEMPLOYMENT, DISABILITIES",
author = "Eric Emerson and Chris Hatton and Susannah Baines and Janet Robertson",
year = "2018",
month = mar
day = "27",
doi = "10.1186/s12889-018-5337-5",
language = "English",
volume = "18",
journal = "BMC Public Health",
issn = "1471-2458",
publisher = "BMC",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The association between employment status and health among British adults with and without intellectual impairments

T2 - cross-sectional analyses of a cohort study

AU - Emerson, Eric

AU - Hatton, Chris

AU - Baines, Susannah

AU - Robertson, Janet

PY - 2018/3/27

Y1 - 2018/3/27

N2 - Background: There exists a well established link between employment status and health, with unemployment being associated with poorer health. Much less is known about the association between economic inactivity and health, especially among people with disabilities. Our aim is to determine whether the association between employment status and health is similar for adults with and adults without intellectual impairment.Methods: Using nationally representative data from the 1970 British Cohort Study, we undertook a series of cross sectional analyses of the association between employment status and health (self-reported general health, mental health) among British adults with and without intellectual impairments at ages 26, 30, 34, 38 and 42.Results: People with intellectual disability and borderline intellectual functioning had markedly lower employment rates and poorer health than other participants at all waves of data collection. When compared with participants in full-time employment the prevalence of poorer self rated health and mental health was higher among participants with and without intellectual impairment who were in either part-time employment or were economically inactive at all ages. When compared with participants in employment the prevalence of poorer self rated health and mental health was higher among participants with and without intellectual impairment who were in the economically inactive categories of unemployment, education/training and ill/disabled at all ages. Intellectual disability status appeared to moderate the strength of the relationship between economic activity and self-rated health and, to a much lesser extent, the relationship between economic activity and mental health. In all instances the moderation indicated a stronger association among participants without intellectual impairment.Conclusions: The results provide substantive evidence to suggest that the nature of the well-established association between employment and better health is similar for British adults with and without intellectual impairments. The results do, however, indicate that the magnitude of the effect involved differed. Further research is needed to identify mechanisms that may underlie this difference.

AB - Background: There exists a well established link between employment status and health, with unemployment being associated with poorer health. Much less is known about the association between economic inactivity and health, especially among people with disabilities. Our aim is to determine whether the association between employment status and health is similar for adults with and adults without intellectual impairment.Methods: Using nationally representative data from the 1970 British Cohort Study, we undertook a series of cross sectional analyses of the association between employment status and health (self-reported general health, mental health) among British adults with and without intellectual impairments at ages 26, 30, 34, 38 and 42.Results: People with intellectual disability and borderline intellectual functioning had markedly lower employment rates and poorer health than other participants at all waves of data collection. When compared with participants in full-time employment the prevalence of poorer self rated health and mental health was higher among participants with and without intellectual impairment who were in either part-time employment or were economically inactive at all ages. When compared with participants in employment the prevalence of poorer self rated health and mental health was higher among participants with and without intellectual impairment who were in the economically inactive categories of unemployment, education/training and ill/disabled at all ages. Intellectual disability status appeared to moderate the strength of the relationship between economic activity and self-rated health and, to a much lesser extent, the relationship between economic activity and mental health. In all instances the moderation indicated a stronger association among participants without intellectual impairment.Conclusions: The results provide substantive evidence to suggest that the nature of the well-established association between employment and better health is similar for British adults with and without intellectual impairments. The results do, however, indicate that the magnitude of the effect involved differed. Further research is needed to identify mechanisms that may underlie this difference.

KW - Employment

KW - Health

KW - Intellectual disability

KW - Intellectual impairment

KW - Borderline intellectual functioning

KW - Cognitive ability

KW - HOUSEHOLD PANEL SURVEY

KW - SELF-RATED HEALTH

KW - PAID EMPLOYMENT

KW - MENTAL-HEALTH

KW - ILL HEALTH

KW - TRANSITIONS

KW - POPULATION

KW - PARTICIPATION

KW - UNEMPLOYMENT

KW - DISABILITIES

U2 - 10.1186/s12889-018-5337-5

DO - 10.1186/s12889-018-5337-5

M3 - Journal article

VL - 18

JO - BMC Public Health

JF - BMC Public Health

SN - 1471-2458

M1 - 401

ER -