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  • art%3A10.1007%2Fs10606-014-9202-5 (1)

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The day-to-day co-production of ageing in place

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>06/2014
<mark>Journal</mark>Computer Supported Cooperative Work
Issue number3
Volume23
Number of pages23
Pages (from-to)245-267
Publication statusPublished
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

We report findings from a study that set out to explore the experience of older people living with assisted living technologies and care services. We find that successful ‘ageing in place’ is socially and collaboratively accomplished – ‘co-produced’ – day-to-day by the efforts of older people, and their formal and informal networks of carers (e.g. family, friends, neighbours). First, we reveal how ‘bricolage’ allows care recipients and family members to customise assisted living technologies to individual needs. We argue that making customisation easier through better design must be part of making assisted living technologies ‘work’. Second, we draw attention to the importance of formal and informal carers establishing and maintaining mutual awareness of the older person’s circumstances day-to-day so they can act in a concerted and coordinated way when problems arise. Unfortunately, neither the design of most current assisted living technologies, nor the ways care services are typically configured, acknowledges these realities of ageing in place. We conclude that rather than more ‘advanced’ technologies, the success of ageing in place programmes will depend on effortful alignments in the technical, organisational and social configuration of support.

Bibliographic note

The original publication is available at www.link.springer.com This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits any use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and the source are credited.