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  • i0744JC_VE_Linkenauger_Response_R3

    Rights statement: The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, i-Perception, 6 (5), 2015, © SAGE Publications Ltd, 2015 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the i-Perception page: http://ipe.sagepub.com/ on SAGE Journals Online: http://online.sagepub.com/

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The relative nature of perception: a response to Canal-Bruland and van der Kamp (2015)

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>10/2015
<mark>Journal</mark>i-Perception
Issue number5
Volume6
Number of pages5
Publication statusPublished
Early online date2/09/15
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Cañal-Bruland and van der Kamp (2015) present an argument about the incommensurate relationship between affordance perception and spatial perception in a criticism of Proffitt and Linkenauger (2013)’s phenotypic approach to perception. Many of their criticisms are based on a difference in the interpretation of the core ideas underlying the phenotypic approach. The most important of these differences in interpretations concern fundamental assumptions about the nature of the perceptions of size and distance themselves. Extent perception must be relative to the organism; therefore, there can be no veridical perception of space. Also, we argue in the phenotypic approach that space perception is an emergent property of affordance perception; they are not different types of perceptions as Cañal-Bruland and van der Kamp presume. Thirdly, affordance perception need not be perfectly accurate, just good enough. Additionally, affordance perception need not be dichotomous; this presumption likely originates in the methodology typically employed to study affordance perception. Finally, I agree with Cañal-Bruland and van der Kamp that joint research efforts will clarify and improve our understanding of these issues.

Bibliographic note

The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, i-Perception, 6 (5), 2015, © SAGE Publications Ltd, 2015 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the i-Perception page: http://ipe.sagepub.com/ on SAGE Journals Online: http://online.sagepub.com/