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    Rights statement: An edited version of this paper was published by AGU. Copyright 2017 American Geophysical Union. Bonfond, B., J. Saur, D. Grodent, S. V. Badman, D. Bisikalo, V. Shematovich, J.‐C. Gérard, and A. Radioti (2017), The tails of the satellite auroral footprints at Jupiter, J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics, 122, 7985–7996, doi:10.1002/2017JA024370.

    Accepted author manuscript, 17.4 MB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

  • Bonfond_et_al-2017-Journal_of_Geophysical_Research%3A_Space_Physics

    Rights statement: ©2017. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

    Final published version, 4.81 MB, PDF document

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The tails of the satellite auroral footprints at Jupiter

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
  • B. Bonfond
  • J. Saur
  • D. Grodent
  • S. V. Badman
  • D. Bisikalo
  • V. Shematovich
  • J. -C. Gerard
  • A. Radioti
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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>08/2017
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics
Issue number8
Volume122
Number of pages12
Pages (from-to)7985-7996
Publication statusPublished
Early online date2/08/17
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

The electromagnetic interaction between Io, Europa, and Ganymede and the rotating plasma that surrounds Jupiter has a signature in the aurora of the planet. This signature, called the satellite footprint, takes the form of a series of spots located slightly downstream of the feet of the field lines passing through the moon under consideration. In the case of Io, these spots are also followed by an extended tail in the downstream direction relative to the plasma flow encountering the moon. A few examples of a tail for the Europa footprint have also been reported in the northern hemisphere. Here we present a simplified Alfvenic model for footprint tails and simulations of vertical brightness profiles for various electron distributions, which favor such a model over quasi-static models. We also report here additional cases of Europa footprint tails, in both hemispheres, even though such detections are rare and difficult. Furthermore, we show that the Ganymede footprint can also be followed by a similar tail. Finally, we present a case of a 320 degrees long Io footprint tail, while other cases in similar configurations do not display such a length.

Bibliographic note

An edited version of this paper was published by AGU. Copyright 2017 American Geophysical Union. Bonfond, B., J. Saur, D. Grodent, S. V. Badman, D. Bisikalo, V. Shematovich, J.‐C. Gérard, and A. Radioti (2017), The tails of the satellite auroral footprints at Jupiter, J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics, 122, 7985–7996, doi:10.1002/2017JA024370.