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Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Validation of the Alder Hey Triage Pain Score
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Validation of the Alder Hey Triage Pain Score

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published

Journal publication date2004
JournalArchives of Disease in Childhood
Journal number7
Volume89
Number of pages6
Pages625-630
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Aims: To describe the validation and reliability of a new pain tool (the Alder Hey Triage Pain Score, AHTPS) for children at triage in the accident and emergency (A&E) setting.

Methods: A new behavioural observational pain tool was developed because of dissatisfaction with available tools and a lack of confidence in self-assessment scores at triage. The study was conducted in a large paediatric A&E department; 575 children (aged 0–16 years) were included. Inter-rater reliability and various aspects of validity were assessed. In addition this tool was compared to the Wong-Baker self-assessment tool.1 The children were concurrently scored by a research nurse and triage nurses to assess inter-rater reliability. Construct validity was assessed by comparing the research nurse’s triage score with the research nurse reassessment score after intervention and/or analgesia. Known group construct validity was assessed by comparing the research nurse’s score at triage with the level of pain of the condition as judged by the discharge diagnosis. Predictive validity was assessed by comparing the research nurse’s AHTPS with the level of analgesia needed by each patient. The AHTPS was also compared to a self-assessment score.

Results: A high level of inter-rater reliability, kappa statistic 0.84 (95% CI 0.80 to 0.88), was shown. Construct validity was well demonstrated; known group construct validity and predictive validity were also demonstrated to a varying degree.

Conclusions: Results support the use of this observational pain scoring tool in the triage of children in A&E.