Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Would I be helped?

Electronic data

  • Would I be Helped - Cross-National CCTV Footage Shows That Intervention Is the Norm in Public Conflicts - Postprint

    Rights statement: ©American Psychological Association, 2019. This paper is not the copy of record and may not exactly replicate the authoritative document published in the APA journal. Please do not copy or cite without author's permission. The final article is available, upon publication, at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000469

    Accepted author manuscript, 735 KB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Would I be helped?: Cross-national CCTV footage shows that intervention is the norm in public conflicts

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published

Standard

Would I be helped? Cross-national CCTV footage shows that intervention is the norm in public conflicts. / Philpot, Richard; Liebst, Lasse Suonperä; Levine, Mark; Bernasco, Wim; Lindegaard, Marie Rosenkrantz.

In: American Psychologist, Vol. 75, No. 1, 01.02.2020, p. 66-75.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

APA

Vancouver

Author

Philpot, Richard ; Liebst, Lasse Suonperä ; Levine, Mark ; Bernasco, Wim ; Lindegaard, Marie Rosenkrantz. / Would I be helped? Cross-national CCTV footage shows that intervention is the norm in public conflicts. In: American Psychologist. 2020 ; Vol. 75, No. 1. pp. 66-75.

Bibtex

@article{f30d7b833a2a4d9ea1d8214ea86924cf,
title = "Would I be helped?: Cross-national CCTV footage shows that intervention is the norm in public conflicts",
abstract = "Half a century of research on bystander behavior concludes that individuals are less likely to intervene during an emergency when in the presence of others than when alone. By contrast, little is known regarding the aggregated likelihood that at least someone present at an emergency will do something to help. The importance of establishing this aggregated intervention baseline is not only of scholarly interest but is also the most pressing question for actual public victims—will I receive help if needed? The current article describes the largest systematic study of real-life bystander intervention in actual public conflicts captured by surveillance cameras. Using a unique cross-national video dataset from the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, and South Africa (N = 219), we show that in 9 of 10 public conflicts, at least 1 bystander, but typically several, will do something to help. We record similar likelihoods of intervention across the 3 national contexts, which differ greatly in levels of perceived public safety. Finally, we find that increased bystander presence is related to a greater likelihood that someone will intervene. Taken together these findings allay the widespread fear that bystanders rarely intervene to help. We argue that it is time for psychology to change the narrative away from an absence of help and toward a new understanding of what makes intervention successful or unsuccessful. ",
author = "Richard Philpot and Liebst, {Lasse Suonper{\"a}} and Mark Levine and Wim Bernasco and Lindegaard, {Marie Rosenkrantz}",
note = "{\textcopyright}American Psychological Association, 2019. This paper is not the copy of record and may not exactly replicate the authoritative document published in the APA journal. Please do not copy or cite without author's permission. The final article is available, upon publication, at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000469",
year = "2020",
month = feb
day = "1",
doi = "10.1037/amp0000469",
language = "English",
volume = "75",
pages = "66--75",
journal = "American Psychologist",
issn = "0003-066X",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Would I be helped?

T2 - Cross-national CCTV footage shows that intervention is the norm in public conflicts

AU - Philpot, Richard

AU - Liebst, Lasse Suonperä

AU - Levine, Mark

AU - Bernasco, Wim

AU - Lindegaard, Marie Rosenkrantz

N1 - ©American Psychological Association, 2019. This paper is not the copy of record and may not exactly replicate the authoritative document published in the APA journal. Please do not copy or cite without author's permission. The final article is available, upon publication, at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000469

PY - 2020/2/1

Y1 - 2020/2/1

N2 - Half a century of research on bystander behavior concludes that individuals are less likely to intervene during an emergency when in the presence of others than when alone. By contrast, little is known regarding the aggregated likelihood that at least someone present at an emergency will do something to help. The importance of establishing this aggregated intervention baseline is not only of scholarly interest but is also the most pressing question for actual public victims—will I receive help if needed? The current article describes the largest systematic study of real-life bystander intervention in actual public conflicts captured by surveillance cameras. Using a unique cross-national video dataset from the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, and South Africa (N = 219), we show that in 9 of 10 public conflicts, at least 1 bystander, but typically several, will do something to help. We record similar likelihoods of intervention across the 3 national contexts, which differ greatly in levels of perceived public safety. Finally, we find that increased bystander presence is related to a greater likelihood that someone will intervene. Taken together these findings allay the widespread fear that bystanders rarely intervene to help. We argue that it is time for psychology to change the narrative away from an absence of help and toward a new understanding of what makes intervention successful or unsuccessful.

AB - Half a century of research on bystander behavior concludes that individuals are less likely to intervene during an emergency when in the presence of others than when alone. By contrast, little is known regarding the aggregated likelihood that at least someone present at an emergency will do something to help. The importance of establishing this aggregated intervention baseline is not only of scholarly interest but is also the most pressing question for actual public victims—will I receive help if needed? The current article describes the largest systematic study of real-life bystander intervention in actual public conflicts captured by surveillance cameras. Using a unique cross-national video dataset from the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, and South Africa (N = 219), we show that in 9 of 10 public conflicts, at least 1 bystander, but typically several, will do something to help. We record similar likelihoods of intervention across the 3 national contexts, which differ greatly in levels of perceived public safety. Finally, we find that increased bystander presence is related to a greater likelihood that someone will intervene. Taken together these findings allay the widespread fear that bystanders rarely intervene to help. We argue that it is time for psychology to change the narrative away from an absence of help and toward a new understanding of what makes intervention successful or unsuccessful.

U2 - 10.1037/amp0000469

DO - 10.1037/amp0000469

M3 - Journal article

VL - 75

SP - 66

EP - 75

JO - American Psychologist

JF - American Psychologist

SN - 0003-066X

IS - 1

ER -