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A General Audiovisual Temporal Processing Deficit in Adult Readers With Dyslexia

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A General Audiovisual Temporal Processing Deficit in Adult Readers With Dyslexia. / Francisco, Ana A.; Jesse, Alexandra; Groen, Margriet A.; McQueen, James M.

In: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Vol. 60, No. 1, 01.01.2017, p. 144-158.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Francisco, AA, Jesse, A, Groen, MA & McQueen, JM 2017, 'A General Audiovisual Temporal Processing Deficit in Adult Readers With Dyslexia', Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, vol. 60, no. 1, pp. 144-158. https://doi.org/10.1044/2016_jslhr-h-15-0375

APA

Francisco, A. A., Jesse, A., Groen, M. A., & McQueen, J. M. (2017). A General Audiovisual Temporal Processing Deficit in Adult Readers With Dyslexia. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 60(1), 144-158. https://doi.org/10.1044/2016_jslhr-h-15-0375

Vancouver

Francisco AA, Jesse A, Groen MA, McQueen JM. A General Audiovisual Temporal Processing Deficit in Adult Readers With Dyslexia. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research. 2017 Jan 1;60(1):144-158. https://doi.org/10.1044/2016_jslhr-h-15-0375

Author

Francisco, Ana A. ; Jesse, Alexandra ; Groen, Margriet A. ; McQueen, James M. / A General Audiovisual Temporal Processing Deficit in Adult Readers With Dyslexia. In: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research. 2017 ; Vol. 60, No. 1. pp. 144-158.

Bibtex

@article{69c2b22c5d6a43f8966d0d9b71842774,
title = "A General Audiovisual Temporal Processing Deficit in Adult Readers With Dyslexia",
abstract = "PurposeBecause reading is an audiovisual process, reading impairment may reflect an audiovisual processing deficit. The aim of the present study was to test the existence and scope of such a deficit in adult readers with dyslexia.MethodWe tested 39 typical readers and 51 adult readers with dyslexia on their sensitivity to the simultaneity of audiovisual speech and nonspeech stimuli, their time window of audiovisual integration for speech (using incongruent /aCa/ syllables), and their audiovisual perception of phonetic categories.ResultsAdult readers with dyslexia showed less sensitivity to audiovisual simultaneity than typical readers for both speech and nonspeech events. We found no differences between readers with dyslexia and typical readers in the temporal window of integration for audiovisual speech or in the audiovisual perception of phonetic categories.ConclusionsThe results suggest an audiovisual temporal deficit in dyslexia that is not specific to speech-related events. But the differences found for audiovisual temporal sensitivity did not translate into a deficit in audiovisual speech perception. Hence, there seems to be a hiatus between simultaneity judgment and perception, suggesting a multisensory system that uses different mechanisms across tasks. Alternatively, it is possible that the audiovisual deficit in dyslexia is only observable when explicit judgments about audiovisual simultaneity are required.",
author = "Francisco, {Ana A.} and Alexandra Jesse and Groen, {Margriet A.} and McQueen, {James M.}",
year = "2017",
month = jan,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1044/2016_jslhr-h-15-0375",
language = "English",
volume = "60",
pages = "144--158",
journal = "Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research",
issn = "1092-4388",
publisher = "American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - A General Audiovisual Temporal Processing Deficit in Adult Readers With Dyslexia

AU - Francisco, Ana A.

AU - Jesse, Alexandra

AU - Groen, Margriet A.

AU - McQueen, James M.

PY - 2017/1/1

Y1 - 2017/1/1

N2 - PurposeBecause reading is an audiovisual process, reading impairment may reflect an audiovisual processing deficit. The aim of the present study was to test the existence and scope of such a deficit in adult readers with dyslexia.MethodWe tested 39 typical readers and 51 adult readers with dyslexia on their sensitivity to the simultaneity of audiovisual speech and nonspeech stimuli, their time window of audiovisual integration for speech (using incongruent /aCa/ syllables), and their audiovisual perception of phonetic categories.ResultsAdult readers with dyslexia showed less sensitivity to audiovisual simultaneity than typical readers for both speech and nonspeech events. We found no differences between readers with dyslexia and typical readers in the temporal window of integration for audiovisual speech or in the audiovisual perception of phonetic categories.ConclusionsThe results suggest an audiovisual temporal deficit in dyslexia that is not specific to speech-related events. But the differences found for audiovisual temporal sensitivity did not translate into a deficit in audiovisual speech perception. Hence, there seems to be a hiatus between simultaneity judgment and perception, suggesting a multisensory system that uses different mechanisms across tasks. Alternatively, it is possible that the audiovisual deficit in dyslexia is only observable when explicit judgments about audiovisual simultaneity are required.

AB - PurposeBecause reading is an audiovisual process, reading impairment may reflect an audiovisual processing deficit. The aim of the present study was to test the existence and scope of such a deficit in adult readers with dyslexia.MethodWe tested 39 typical readers and 51 adult readers with dyslexia on their sensitivity to the simultaneity of audiovisual speech and nonspeech stimuli, their time window of audiovisual integration for speech (using incongruent /aCa/ syllables), and their audiovisual perception of phonetic categories.ResultsAdult readers with dyslexia showed less sensitivity to audiovisual simultaneity than typical readers for both speech and nonspeech events. We found no differences between readers with dyslexia and typical readers in the temporal window of integration for audiovisual speech or in the audiovisual perception of phonetic categories.ConclusionsThe results suggest an audiovisual temporal deficit in dyslexia that is not specific to speech-related events. But the differences found for audiovisual temporal sensitivity did not translate into a deficit in audiovisual speech perception. Hence, there seems to be a hiatus between simultaneity judgment and perception, suggesting a multisensory system that uses different mechanisms across tasks. Alternatively, it is possible that the audiovisual deficit in dyslexia is only observable when explicit judgments about audiovisual simultaneity are required.

U2 - 10.1044/2016_jslhr-h-15-0375

DO - 10.1044/2016_jslhr-h-15-0375

M3 - Journal article

VL - 60

SP - 144

EP - 158

JO - Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research

JF - Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research

SN - 1092-4388

IS - 1

ER -