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A living wage for London?

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A living wage for London? / Grover, Christopher.

In: Benefits, Vol. 16, No. 1, 2008, p. 71-79.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

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Grover C. A living wage for London? Benefits. 2008;16(1):71-79.

Author

Grover, Christopher. / A living wage for London?. In: Benefits. 2008 ; Vol. 16, No. 1. pp. 71-79.

Bibtex

@article{9ea6973137f141fc91b8ec6beba2ad53,
title = "A living wage for London?",
abstract = "Following the 2004 London mayoral election, the successful candidate, Ken Livingstone, set up a Living Wage Unit to produce a figure for a living wage for London and to push for its implementation across a number of London-wide public employers. This article critically examines the way in which the living wage for London has been calculated and the assumptions on which it is premised. The article argues that while the Greater London Authority should be applauded for being the first local authority in Britain to commit itself to a wage premised on a notion of need, it is difficult to consider its suggested wage to be a living wage because of flaws in the way it has been calculated.",
author = "Christopher Grover",
year = "2008",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
pages = "71--79",
journal = "Benefits",
issn = "0962-7898",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - A living wage for London?

AU - Grover, Christopher

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - Following the 2004 London mayoral election, the successful candidate, Ken Livingstone, set up a Living Wage Unit to produce a figure for a living wage for London and to push for its implementation across a number of London-wide public employers. This article critically examines the way in which the living wage for London has been calculated and the assumptions on which it is premised. The article argues that while the Greater London Authority should be applauded for being the first local authority in Britain to commit itself to a wage premised on a notion of need, it is difficult to consider its suggested wage to be a living wage because of flaws in the way it has been calculated.

AB - Following the 2004 London mayoral election, the successful candidate, Ken Livingstone, set up a Living Wage Unit to produce a figure for a living wage for London and to push for its implementation across a number of London-wide public employers. This article critically examines the way in which the living wage for London has been calculated and the assumptions on which it is premised. The article argues that while the Greater London Authority should be applauded for being the first local authority in Britain to commit itself to a wage premised on a notion of need, it is difficult to consider its suggested wage to be a living wage because of flaws in the way it has been calculated.

M3 - Journal article

VL - 16

SP - 71

EP - 79

JO - Benefits

JF - Benefits

SN - 0962-7898

IS - 1

ER -