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  • PAPER CHINESE AIRLINESv5 - revised %282%29 reviewed version

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, 101, 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.tra.2017.05.003

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A structural vector autoregressive model of technical efficiency and delays with an application to Chinese airlines

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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>07/2017
<mark>Journal</mark>Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice
Volume101
Number of pages10
Pages (from-to)1-10
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date10/05/17
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Abstract This study reports on the performance assessment of Chinese airlines from 2006 to 2014 using a stochastic distance function where technical efficiency and a measure of flight delays follow a joint structural autoregressive process. This model is used to investigate whether technical efficiency causes flight punctuality or the other way around. The model, however, yields a non-trivial likelihood function and is not amenable to estimation using least squares or standard maximum likelihood techniques. To estimate the model therefore, we propose and implement maximum simulated likelihood with importance sampling. The results suggest a mutual dependence (feedback) between technical efficiency and delays. Policy implications are derived.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, 101, 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.tra.2017.05.003