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    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Aging and Mental Health on 18/07/2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/13607863.2017.1348476

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A systematic review of the prevalence of comorbid cancer and dementia and its implications for cancer-related care

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

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A systematic review of the prevalence of comorbid cancer and dementia and its implications for cancer-related care. / Mcwilliams, Lorna; Farrell, Carole; Grande, Gunn; Keady, John; Swarbrick, Caroline; Yorke, Janelle.

In: Aging and Mental Health, Vol. 22, No. 10, 01.10.2018, p. 1254-1271.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Mcwilliams, L, Farrell, C, Grande, G, Keady, J, Swarbrick, C & Yorke, J 2018, 'A systematic review of the prevalence of comorbid cancer and dementia and its implications for cancer-related care', Aging and Mental Health, vol. 22, no. 10, pp. 1254-1271. https://doi.org/10.1080/13607863.2017.1348476

APA

Mcwilliams, L., Farrell, C., Grande, G., Keady, J., Swarbrick, C., & Yorke, J. (2018). A systematic review of the prevalence of comorbid cancer and dementia and its implications for cancer-related care. Aging and Mental Health, 22(10), 1254-1271. https://doi.org/10.1080/13607863.2017.1348476

Vancouver

Author

Mcwilliams, Lorna ; Farrell, Carole ; Grande, Gunn ; Keady, John ; Swarbrick, Caroline ; Yorke, Janelle. / A systematic review of the prevalence of comorbid cancer and dementia and its implications for cancer-related care. In: Aging and Mental Health. 2018 ; Vol. 22, No. 10. pp. 1254-1271.

Bibtex

@article{bc1adc1cf26d4153aaaa3b5e2a18ad90,
title = "A systematic review of the prevalence of comorbid cancer and dementia and its implications for cancer-related care",
abstract = "Objectives: A comorbid diagnosis of cancer and dementia (cancer-dementia) may have uniqueimplications for patient cancer-related experience. The objectives were to estimate prevalence ofcancer-dementia and related experiences of people with dementia, their carers and cancer cliniciansincluding cancer screening, diagnosis, treatment and palliative care. Method: Databases weresearched (CINAHL, Psychinfo, Medline, Embase, BNI) using key terms such as dementia, cancer andexperience. Inclusion criteria were: a) English language, b) published any time until early 2016, c)diagnosis of cancer-dementia and d) original articles that assessed prevalence and/or cancer-relatedexperiences including screening, cancer treatment and survival. Due to variations in study design andoutcomes, study data were synthesized narratively. Results: Forty-seven studies were included in thereview with a mix of quantitative (n = 44) and qualitative (n = 3) methodologies. Thirty-four studiesreported varied cancer-dementia prevalence rates (range 0.2-45.6%); the others reported reducedlikelihood of receiving: cancer screening, cancer staging information, cancer treatment with curativeintent and pain management, compared to those with cancer only. The findings indicate poorercancer-related clinical outcomes including late diagnosis and higher mortality rates in those withcancer-dementia despite greater health service use. Conclusions: There is a dearth of good qualityevidence investigating the cancer-dementia prevalence and its implications for successful cancertreatment. Findings suggest that dementia is associated with poorer cancer outcomes although thereasons for this are not yet clear. Further research is needed to better understand the impact of cancerdementiaand enable patients, carers and clinicians to make informed cancer-related decisions.",
keywords = "Dementia and Cognitive, Physical Health Status, Health Service Use, Cancer, Systematic Review",
author = "Lorna Mcwilliams and Carole Farrell and Gunn Grande and John Keady and Caroline Swarbrick and Janelle Yorke",
note = "This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Aging and Mental Health on 18/07/2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/13607863.2017.1348476",
year = "2018",
month = oct,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/13607863.2017.1348476",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
pages = "1254--1271",
journal = "Aging and Mental Health",
issn = "1360-7863",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "10",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - A systematic review of the prevalence of comorbid cancer and dementia and its implications for cancer-related care

AU - Mcwilliams, Lorna

AU - Farrell, Carole

AU - Grande, Gunn

AU - Keady, John

AU - Swarbrick, Caroline

AU - Yorke, Janelle

N1 - This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Aging and Mental Health on 18/07/2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/13607863.2017.1348476

PY - 2018/10/1

Y1 - 2018/10/1

N2 - Objectives: A comorbid diagnosis of cancer and dementia (cancer-dementia) may have uniqueimplications for patient cancer-related experience. The objectives were to estimate prevalence ofcancer-dementia and related experiences of people with dementia, their carers and cancer cliniciansincluding cancer screening, diagnosis, treatment and palliative care. Method: Databases weresearched (CINAHL, Psychinfo, Medline, Embase, BNI) using key terms such as dementia, cancer andexperience. Inclusion criteria were: a) English language, b) published any time until early 2016, c)diagnosis of cancer-dementia and d) original articles that assessed prevalence and/or cancer-relatedexperiences including screening, cancer treatment and survival. Due to variations in study design andoutcomes, study data were synthesized narratively. Results: Forty-seven studies were included in thereview with a mix of quantitative (n = 44) and qualitative (n = 3) methodologies. Thirty-four studiesreported varied cancer-dementia prevalence rates (range 0.2-45.6%); the others reported reducedlikelihood of receiving: cancer screening, cancer staging information, cancer treatment with curativeintent and pain management, compared to those with cancer only. The findings indicate poorercancer-related clinical outcomes including late diagnosis and higher mortality rates in those withcancer-dementia despite greater health service use. Conclusions: There is a dearth of good qualityevidence investigating the cancer-dementia prevalence and its implications for successful cancertreatment. Findings suggest that dementia is associated with poorer cancer outcomes although thereasons for this are not yet clear. Further research is needed to better understand the impact of cancerdementiaand enable patients, carers and clinicians to make informed cancer-related decisions.

AB - Objectives: A comorbid diagnosis of cancer and dementia (cancer-dementia) may have uniqueimplications for patient cancer-related experience. The objectives were to estimate prevalence ofcancer-dementia and related experiences of people with dementia, their carers and cancer cliniciansincluding cancer screening, diagnosis, treatment and palliative care. Method: Databases weresearched (CINAHL, Psychinfo, Medline, Embase, BNI) using key terms such as dementia, cancer andexperience. Inclusion criteria were: a) English language, b) published any time until early 2016, c)diagnosis of cancer-dementia and d) original articles that assessed prevalence and/or cancer-relatedexperiences including screening, cancer treatment and survival. Due to variations in study design andoutcomes, study data were synthesized narratively. Results: Forty-seven studies were included in thereview with a mix of quantitative (n = 44) and qualitative (n = 3) methodologies. Thirty-four studiesreported varied cancer-dementia prevalence rates (range 0.2-45.6%); the others reported reducedlikelihood of receiving: cancer screening, cancer staging information, cancer treatment with curativeintent and pain management, compared to those with cancer only. The findings indicate poorercancer-related clinical outcomes including late diagnosis and higher mortality rates in those withcancer-dementia despite greater health service use. Conclusions: There is a dearth of good qualityevidence investigating the cancer-dementia prevalence and its implications for successful cancertreatment. Findings suggest that dementia is associated with poorer cancer outcomes although thereasons for this are not yet clear. Further research is needed to better understand the impact of cancerdementiaand enable patients, carers and clinicians to make informed cancer-related decisions.

KW - Dementia and Cognitive

KW - Physical Health Status

KW - Health Service Use

KW - Cancer

KW - Systematic Review

U2 - 10.1080/13607863.2017.1348476

DO - 10.1080/13607863.2017.1348476

M3 - Journal article

VL - 22

SP - 1254

EP - 1271

JO - Aging and Mental Health

JF - Aging and Mental Health

SN - 1360-7863

IS - 10

ER -