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  • Raiker et al (2017) Accuracy of Achenbach Scales in the Screening of Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 56, 5, 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.jaac.2017.02.007

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Accuracy of Achenbach Scales in the Screening of ADHD in a Community Mental Health Clinic

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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>05/2017
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of the Amercian Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Issue number5
Volume56
Number of pages9
Pages (from-to)401-409
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date6/03/17
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Objective To use receiver-operating characteristics analysis to identify multilevel diagnostic likelihood ratios and provide a framework for the diagnosis of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children (5–10 years old) and adolescents (11–18 years old) in an outpatient setting. Method Caregiver, teacher, and youth reports from the Achenbach System of Empirically Based Assessment (ASEBA) were obtained for 299 children and 321 adolescents with multiple imputation of missing data. The reference standard was diagnosis of ADHD based on case history and a semistructured diagnostic interview masked to the ASEBA measurements. Results In children, caregiver-reported Attention Problems (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.74) outperformed all other subscales of the caregiver and teacher measures (AUCs ≤ 0.72). In the older sample, caregiver- and teacher-reported Attention Problems (caregiver AUC = 0.73; teacher AUC = 0.61) were best at identifying ADHD. Inclusion of caregiver and teacher reports significantly (p < .001 for all comparisons) increased prediction of ADHD diagnosis, whereas youth self-report did not. Conclusion Caregiver-reported Attention Problems were more useful than teacher-reports and self-report in identifying ADHD. Combining caregiver and teacher reports improved identification. Multilevel likelihood ratios are provided to facilitate routine clinical use.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 56, 5, 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.jaac.2017.02.007