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    Rights statement: The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Ethnicities, 21 (2), 2021, © SAGE Publications Ltd, 2021 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Ethnicities page: https://journals.sagepub.com/home/etn on SAGE Journals Online: http://journals.sagepub.com/

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Afterword: Interrogating naturalisation, naturalised uncertainty and anxious states

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Afterword: Interrogating naturalisation, naturalised uncertainty and anxious states. / Fortier, A.-M.

In: Ethnicities, Vol. 21, No. 2, 01.04.2021, p. 395-407.

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

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@article{7f544f5212de49949e3083e796381c23,
title = "Afterword: Interrogating naturalisation, naturalised uncertainty and anxious states",
abstract = "This afterword addresses four broad questions raised by this special issue: uncertainty as a mode of governance, the ontological politics of naturalisation, the citizen-noncitizen distinction, and performative (anxious) states. First, taking uncertainty as a mode of neoliberal governance as the starting point of analysis, this afterword invites the scrutiny of the ways in which the artifice and uncertainty of citizenship are concealed or rendered irrelevant in naturalisation processes. Second, the contributions to this special issue consider naturalisation as a social and political process, rather than solely as a legal status. Pushing this conception further, this afterword considers naturalisation as transactional in two ways: on the one hand, migrants navigate a number of formal and informal requirements and {\textquoteleft}tests{\textquoteright}, where some transactions are needed along the way, be they financial, practical, or symbolic. On the other hand, transactions will also occur in the translation of political ideology into policy. Third, naturalisation regimes both blur and reify the citizen-noncitizen and the citizen-migrant distinctions. Distinctions which this afterword unpacks by unravelling the assumed separation between citizenship and migration. How are citizens and migrants migratised? How are migrants and citizens citizenised? Fourth, a further element of the analysis concerns how state-citizen relations are enacted and by extension, how the state itself is {\textquoteleft}made up{\textquoteright} and {\textquoteleft}anxious{\textquoteright}. The affective politics of {\textquoteleft}anxious states{\textquoteright} are telling of the frames of desire of naturalisation, which are founded on a threefold principle: the desirability of citizenship, the desire for desirable citizens, and the desirability of the state itself. ",
keywords = "anxious state, citizenisation, citizenship, migratisation, Naturalisation, noncitizenship",
author = "A.-M. Fortier",
note = "The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Ethnicities, 21 (2), 2021, {\textcopyright} SAGE Publications Ltd, 2021 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Ethnicities page: https://journals.sagepub.com/home/etn on SAGE Journals Online: http://journals.sagepub.com/ ",
year = "2021",
month = apr,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/14687968211001626",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
pages = "395--407",
journal = "Ethnicities",
issn = "1468-7968",
publisher = "SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Afterword: Interrogating naturalisation, naturalised uncertainty and anxious states

AU - Fortier, A.-M.

N1 - The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Ethnicities, 21 (2), 2021, © SAGE Publications Ltd, 2021 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Ethnicities page: https://journals.sagepub.com/home/etn on SAGE Journals Online: http://journals.sagepub.com/

PY - 2021/4/1

Y1 - 2021/4/1

N2 - This afterword addresses four broad questions raised by this special issue: uncertainty as a mode of governance, the ontological politics of naturalisation, the citizen-noncitizen distinction, and performative (anxious) states. First, taking uncertainty as a mode of neoliberal governance as the starting point of analysis, this afterword invites the scrutiny of the ways in which the artifice and uncertainty of citizenship are concealed or rendered irrelevant in naturalisation processes. Second, the contributions to this special issue consider naturalisation as a social and political process, rather than solely as a legal status. Pushing this conception further, this afterword considers naturalisation as transactional in two ways: on the one hand, migrants navigate a number of formal and informal requirements and ‘tests’, where some transactions are needed along the way, be they financial, practical, or symbolic. On the other hand, transactions will also occur in the translation of political ideology into policy. Third, naturalisation regimes both blur and reify the citizen-noncitizen and the citizen-migrant distinctions. Distinctions which this afterword unpacks by unravelling the assumed separation between citizenship and migration. How are citizens and migrants migratised? How are migrants and citizens citizenised? Fourth, a further element of the analysis concerns how state-citizen relations are enacted and by extension, how the state itself is ‘made up’ and ‘anxious’. The affective politics of ‘anxious states’ are telling of the frames of desire of naturalisation, which are founded on a threefold principle: the desirability of citizenship, the desire for desirable citizens, and the desirability of the state itself.

AB - This afterword addresses four broad questions raised by this special issue: uncertainty as a mode of governance, the ontological politics of naturalisation, the citizen-noncitizen distinction, and performative (anxious) states. First, taking uncertainty as a mode of neoliberal governance as the starting point of analysis, this afterword invites the scrutiny of the ways in which the artifice and uncertainty of citizenship are concealed or rendered irrelevant in naturalisation processes. Second, the contributions to this special issue consider naturalisation as a social and political process, rather than solely as a legal status. Pushing this conception further, this afterword considers naturalisation as transactional in two ways: on the one hand, migrants navigate a number of formal and informal requirements and ‘tests’, where some transactions are needed along the way, be they financial, practical, or symbolic. On the other hand, transactions will also occur in the translation of political ideology into policy. Third, naturalisation regimes both blur and reify the citizen-noncitizen and the citizen-migrant distinctions. Distinctions which this afterword unpacks by unravelling the assumed separation between citizenship and migration. How are citizens and migrants migratised? How are migrants and citizens citizenised? Fourth, a further element of the analysis concerns how state-citizen relations are enacted and by extension, how the state itself is ‘made up’ and ‘anxious’. The affective politics of ‘anxious states’ are telling of the frames of desire of naturalisation, which are founded on a threefold principle: the desirability of citizenship, the desire for desirable citizens, and the desirability of the state itself.

KW - anxious state

KW - citizenisation

KW - citizenship

KW - migratisation

KW - Naturalisation

KW - noncitizenship

U2 - 10.1177/14687968211001626

DO - 10.1177/14687968211001626

M3 - Journal article

VL - 21

SP - 395

EP - 407

JO - Ethnicities

JF - Ethnicities

SN - 1468-7968

IS - 2

ER -