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    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in American Journal of Human Genetics. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in American Journal of Human Genetics, 98, 5, 2016 DOI: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2016.03.006

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Allele-skewed DNA modification in the brain: relevance to a schizophrenia GWAS

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Published
  • Sarah A. Gagliano
  • Carolyn Ptak
  • Denise Y. F. Mak
  • Mehrdad Shamsi
  • Gabriel Oh
  • Joanne Knight
  • Paul C. Boutros
  • Arturas Petronis
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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>5/05/2016
<mark>Journal</mark>American Journal of Human Genetics
Issue number5
Volume98
Number of pages7
Pages (from-to)956-962
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date14/04/16
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Numerous recent studies have suggested that phenotypic effects of DNA sequence variants can be mediated or modulated by their epigenetic marks, such as allele-skewed DNA modification (ASM). Using Affymetrix SNP microarrays, we performed a comprehensive search of ASM effects in human post-mortem brain and sperm samples (total n = 256) from individuals with major psychosis and control individuals. Depending on the phenotypic category of the brain samples, 1.4%-7.5% of interrogated SNPs exhibited ASM effects. Next, we investigated ASM in the context of genetic studies of schizophrenia and detected that brain ASM SNPs were significantly overrepresented among sub-threshold SNPs from a schizophrenia genome-wide association study (GWAS). Brain ASM SNPs showed a much stronger enrichment in a schizophrenia GWAS than in 17 large GWASs of non-psychiatric diseases and traits, arguing that ASM effects are at least partially tissue specific. Studies of germline and control brain ASM SNPs supported a causal association between ASM and schizophrenia. Finally, significantly higher proportions of ASM SNPs than of non-ASM SNPs were detected at loci exhibiting epigenetic signatures of enhancers and promoters, and they were overrepresented within transcription factor binding regions and DNase I hypersensitive sites. All of these findings collectively indicate that ASM SNPs should be prioritized in follow-up GWASs.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in American Journal of Human Genetics. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in American Journal of Human Genetics, 98, 5, 2016 DOI: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2016.03.006