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  • Cousins-2016-Britannia-AM

    Rights statement: https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/britannia/article/an-imperial-image-the-bath-gorgon-in-context/79B3E87D0BBC715F4C1CBDB215774FC4The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Britannia, 47, pp 99-118 2016, © 2016 Cambridge University Press.

    Accepted author manuscript, 231 KB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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An Imperial Image: The Bath Gorgon in Context

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>1/11/2016
<mark>Journal</mark>Britannia
Volume47
Number of pages20
Pages (from-to)99-118
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date2/06/16
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

This paper attempts to put the Gorgon from the pediment of the Temple of Sulis Minerva at Bath into a wider provincial context, by arguing for links between the Gorgon and first- and early second-century imitations in Gaul and Spain of the iconography of the Forum of Augustus in Rome. These imitations, part of what might be called a ‘visual language of empire’, served to connect the urban spaces of the provinces to Rome; by linking the Gorgon to this trend and setting aside interpretations of the Gorgon which have focused on his perceived status as a
‘Romano-Celtic’ masterpiece, we can justify more satisfactorily his position as the centrepiece of a pediment dominated by imperial imagery.

Bibliographic note

https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/britannia/article/an-imperial-image-the-bath-gorgon-in-context/79B3E87D0BBC715F4C1CBDB215774FC4The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Britannia, 47, pp 99-118 2016, © 2016 Cambridge University Press.