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    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Psychiatry, Psychology and Law on 02/06/2020, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13218719.2020.1767720

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An Inventory of Problems–29 (IOP–29) study investigating feigned schizophrenia and random responding in a British community sample

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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>2/06/2020
<mark>Journal</mark>Psychiatry, Psychology and Law
Number of pages20
Publication StatusE-pub ahead of print
Early online date2/06/20
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Compared to other Western countries, malingering research is still relatively scarce in the United Kingdom, partly because only a few brief and easy-to-use symptom validity tests (SVTs) have been validated for use with British test-takers. This online study examined the validity of the Inventory of Problems–29 (IOP–29) in detecting feigned schizophrenia and random responding in 151 British volunteers. Each participant took three IOP–29 test administrations: (a) responding honestly; (b) pretending to suffer from schizophrenia; and
(c) responding at random. Additionally, they also responded to a schizotypy measure (OLIFE) under standard instruction. The IOP–29’s feigning scale (FDS) showed excellent validity in discriminating honest responding from feigned schizophrenia (AUC ¼ .99), and its classification accuracy was not significantly affected by the presence of schizotypal traits. Additionally, a recently introduced IOP–29 scale aimed at detecting random responding (RRS) demonstrated very promising results.

Bibliographic note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Psychiatry, Psychology and Law on 02/06/2020, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13218719.2020.1767720