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  • ProsoFirstFixation2018_vAccepted

    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Visual Cognition on 27/07/2020, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13506285.2020.1797968

    Accepted author manuscript, 391 KB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 27/07/21

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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Atypically heterogeneous vertical first fixations to faces in a case series of people with developmental prosopagnosia

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>1/08/2020
<mark>Journal</mark>Visual Cognition
Issue number4
Volume28
Number of pages13
Pages (from-to)311-323
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date27/07/20
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

When people recognise faces, they normally move their eyes so that their first fixation is in the optimal location for efficient perceptual processing. This location is found just below the centre-point between the eyes. This type of attentional bias could be partly innate, but also an inevitable developmental process that aids our ability to recognise faces. We investigated whether a group of people with developmental prosopagnosia would also demonstrate neurotypical first fixation locations when recognising faces during an eye tracking task. We found evidence that adults with prosopagnosia had atypically heterogeneous first fixations in comparison to controls. However, differences were limited to the vertical, but not horizontal, plane of the face. We interpret these findings by suggesting that subtle changes to face-based eye movement patterns in developmental prosopagnosia may underpin their face recognition impairments, and suggest future work is still needed to address this possibility.

Bibliographic note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Visual Cognition on 27/07/2020, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13506285.2020.1797968