Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Barriers and drivers in online micro-course pro...

Electronic data

  • Natalie.Jane.Howard

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Teaching and Teacher Education. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Teaching and Teacher Education, 105, 2021 DOI: 10.1016/j.tate.2021.103397

    Accepted author manuscript, 422 KB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 3/06/23

    Available under license: CC BY-NC-ND

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Barriers and drivers in online micro-course professional development: Navigating issues of teacher identity and agency

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

E-pub ahead of print
  • N.-J. Howard
Close
Article number103397
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>30/09/2021
<mark>Journal</mark>Teaching and Teacher Education
Volume105
Number of pages12
Publication StatusE-pub ahead of print
Early online date3/06/21
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

This article reports on the barriers and drivers of online micro-course (oMC) professional development in a Middle East college. Semi-structured interviews with teachers yield a rich description of their learning experiences. The findings demonstrate the significance of identity and agency in online professional development: course accessibility advantages, valuable reflexive opportunities and successful practice shifts act as drivers to engagement and bolster identities. Meanwhile, impediments to oMC acceptance are evidenced in constrained peer collaboration, misaligned faculty and organisational interests and forced compliance which restrict agency and marginalise teacher identities. An original, inductive model to guide future research is also presented.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Teaching and Teacher Education. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Teaching and Teacher Education, 105, 2021 DOI: 10.1016/j.tate.2021.103397