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  • Final version before print Being seconded to a Mental Health Trust

    Rights statement: This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in British Journal of Social Work following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated versionLisa Morriss; Being Seconded to a Mental Health Trust: The (In)Visibility of Mental Health Social Work, The British Journal of Social Work, Volume 47, Issue 5, 1 July 2017, Pages 1344–1360, https://doi.org/10.1093/bjsw/bcw022 is available online at: https://academic.oup.com/bjsw/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/bjsw/bcw022

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    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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Being seconded to a Mental Health Trust: the (in)visibility of mental health social work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>1/07/2017
<mark>Journal</mark>British Journal of Social Work
Issue number5
Volume47
Number of pages17
Pages (from-to)1344-1360
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date27/03/16
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

The paper explores the implications of being a social worker seconded to a Mental Health Trust based on narrative interviews with mental health social workers. As part of a wider study, thirteen mental health social workers from across England were interviewed individually about their experiences of being seconded to a Mental Health Trust. Building on the work of Andrew Pithouse, the findings reveal the (in)visibility of mental health social work. The social workers were isolated within Health Trusts with minimal links to their Local Authority employers. They struggled to articulate and define social work. Instead, social work was depicted as being indefinable, involving working in liminal spaces and as filling the gaps left by other professions. Furthermore, the social workers were unable to make social work visible as social work is not ‘seen’ by the other members of the team. Finally, the social workers were unable to make social visible through supervision if they did not have a social work manager. The paper ends with an unexpected outcome of the research: the notion of the research interview as surrogate supervision.

Bibliographic note

This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in British Journal of Social Work following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated versionLisa Morriss; Being Seconded to a Mental Health Trust: The (In)Visibility of Mental Health Social Work, The British Journal of Social Work, Volume 47, Issue 5, 1 July 2017, Pages 1344–1360, https://doi.org/10.1093/bjsw/bcw022 is available online at: https://academic.oup.com/bjsw/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/bjsw/bcw022