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Biomass-based targets and the management of multispecies coral reef fisheries

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Biomass-based targets and the management of multispecies coral reef fisheries. / McClanahan, T. R.; Graham, N. A. J.; MacNeil, M. A.; Cinner, J. E.

In: Conservation Biology, Vol. 29, No. 2, 04.2015, p. 409-417.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

McClanahan, TR, Graham, NAJ, MacNeil, MA & Cinner, JE 2015, 'Biomass-based targets and the management of multispecies coral reef fisheries', Conservation Biology, vol. 29, no. 2, pp. 409-417. https://doi.org/10.1111/cobi.12430

APA

McClanahan, T. R., Graham, N. A. J., MacNeil, M. A., & Cinner, J. E. (2015). Biomass-based targets and the management of multispecies coral reef fisheries. Conservation Biology, 29(2), 409-417. https://doi.org/10.1111/cobi.12430

Vancouver

McClanahan TR, Graham NAJ, MacNeil MA, Cinner JE. Biomass-based targets and the management of multispecies coral reef fisheries. Conservation Biology. 2015 Apr;29(2):409-417. https://doi.org/10.1111/cobi.12430

Author

McClanahan, T. R. ; Graham, N. A. J. ; MacNeil, M. A. ; Cinner, J. E. / Biomass-based targets and the management of multispecies coral reef fisheries. In: Conservation Biology. 2015 ; Vol. 29, No. 2. pp. 409-417.

Bibtex

@article{5a061a60181b4635a53159e729c8ad5f,
title = "Biomass-based targets and the management of multispecies coral reef fisheries",
abstract = "The failure of fisheries management among multispecies coral reef fisheries is well documented and has dire implications for the 100 million people engaged in these small-scale operations. Weak or missing management institutions, a lack of research capacity, and the complex nature of these ecosystems have heralded a call for ecosystem-based management approaches. However, ecosystem-based management of coral reef fisheries has proved challenging due to the multispecies nature of catches and the diversity of fish functional roles. We used data on fish communities collected from 233 individual sites in 9 western Indian Ocean countries to evaluate changes in the site's functional composition and associated life-history characteristics along a large range of fish biomass. As biomass increased along this range, fish were larger and grew and matured more slowly while the abundance of scraping and predatory species increased. The greatest changes in functional composition occurred below relatively low standing stock biomass (",
keywords = "ecosystem function, Indian Ocean, life-history traits, resource management, sustainable fisheries, wilderness, UNDERWATER VISUAL-CENSUS, ECOSYSTEM-BASED MANAGEMENT, REFERENCE POINTS, MARINE RESERVES, ESCAPE GAPS, FISH, RESPONSES, SUSTAINABILITY, EXPLOITATION, COMMUNITIES",
author = "McClanahan, {T. R.} and Graham, {N. A. J.} and MacNeil, {M. A.} and Cinner, {J. E.}",
year = "2015",
month = apr,
doi = "10.1111/cobi.12430",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
pages = "409--417",
journal = "Conservation Biology",
issn = "0888-8892",
publisher = "Blackwell-Wiley",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Biomass-based targets and the management of multispecies coral reef fisheries

AU - McClanahan, T. R.

AU - Graham, N. A. J.

AU - MacNeil, M. A.

AU - Cinner, J. E.

PY - 2015/4

Y1 - 2015/4

N2 - The failure of fisheries management among multispecies coral reef fisheries is well documented and has dire implications for the 100 million people engaged in these small-scale operations. Weak or missing management institutions, a lack of research capacity, and the complex nature of these ecosystems have heralded a call for ecosystem-based management approaches. However, ecosystem-based management of coral reef fisheries has proved challenging due to the multispecies nature of catches and the diversity of fish functional roles. We used data on fish communities collected from 233 individual sites in 9 western Indian Ocean countries to evaluate changes in the site's functional composition and associated life-history characteristics along a large range of fish biomass. As biomass increased along this range, fish were larger and grew and matured more slowly while the abundance of scraping and predatory species increased. The greatest changes in functional composition occurred below relatively low standing stock biomass (

AB - The failure of fisheries management among multispecies coral reef fisheries is well documented and has dire implications for the 100 million people engaged in these small-scale operations. Weak or missing management institutions, a lack of research capacity, and the complex nature of these ecosystems have heralded a call for ecosystem-based management approaches. However, ecosystem-based management of coral reef fisheries has proved challenging due to the multispecies nature of catches and the diversity of fish functional roles. We used data on fish communities collected from 233 individual sites in 9 western Indian Ocean countries to evaluate changes in the site's functional composition and associated life-history characteristics along a large range of fish biomass. As biomass increased along this range, fish were larger and grew and matured more slowly while the abundance of scraping and predatory species increased. The greatest changes in functional composition occurred below relatively low standing stock biomass (

KW - ecosystem function

KW - Indian Ocean

KW - life-history traits

KW - resource management

KW - sustainable fisheries

KW - wilderness

KW - UNDERWATER VISUAL-CENSUS

KW - ECOSYSTEM-BASED MANAGEMENT

KW - REFERENCE POINTS

KW - MARINE RESERVES

KW - ESCAPE GAPS

KW - FISH

KW - RESPONSES

KW - SUSTAINABILITY

KW - EXPLOITATION

KW - COMMUNITIES

U2 - 10.1111/cobi.12430

DO - 10.1111/cobi.12430

M3 - Journal article

VL - 29

SP - 409

EP - 417

JO - Conservation Biology

JF - Conservation Biology

SN - 0888-8892

IS - 2

ER -