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Black and Asian probationers : implications of the Home Office study.

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Black and Asian probationers : implications of the Home Office study. / Smith, David; Calverley, Adam; Cole, Bankole; Kaur, Gurpreet; Lewis, Sam; Raynor, Peter; Sadeghi, Soheila; Vanstone, Maurice; Wardak, Ali.

In: Probation Journal, Vol. 53, No. 1, 01.03.2006, p. 24-37.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Smith, D, Calverley, A, Cole, B, Kaur, G, Lewis, S, Raynor, P, Sadeghi, S, Vanstone, M & Wardak, A 2006, 'Black and Asian probationers : implications of the Home Office study.', Probation Journal, vol. 53, no. 1, pp. 24-37. https://doi.org/10.1177/0264550506060863

APA

Smith, D., Calverley, A., Cole, B., Kaur, G., Lewis, S., Raynor, P., Sadeghi, S., Vanstone, M., & Wardak, A. (2006). Black and Asian probationers : implications of the Home Office study. Probation Journal, 53(1), 24-37. https://doi.org/10.1177/0264550506060863

Vancouver

Smith D, Calverley A, Cole B, Kaur G, Lewis S, Raynor P et al. Black and Asian probationers : implications of the Home Office study. Probation Journal. 2006 Mar 1;53(1):24-37. https://doi.org/10.1177/0264550506060863

Author

Smith, David ; Calverley, Adam ; Cole, Bankole ; Kaur, Gurpreet ; Lewis, Sam ; Raynor, Peter ; Sadeghi, Soheila ; Vanstone, Maurice ; Wardak, Ali. / Black and Asian probationers : implications of the Home Office study. In: Probation Journal. 2006 ; Vol. 53, No. 1. pp. 24-37.

Bibtex

@article{f1486ddf16b4474395b9b9e53ec337ca,
title = "Black and Asian probationers : implications of the Home Office study.",
abstract = "This article presents the main findings of a survey of Black, Asian and mixed heritage men supervised by the probation service in 2001-2003. It discusses the long-standing concern that minority ethnic groups may be subject to discriminatory treatment in the criminal justice system, and examines the probation service{\textquoteright}s response to this concern. In the presentation and discussion of the findings, comparisons are made where possible with predominantly white probation samples. These suggest that minority ethnic offenders in the sample had received the same community sentences as white offenders with higher levels of criminogenic need. The possible meanings of this finding are explored, along with the implications of respondents{\textquoteright} views of what constitutes helpful probation practice.",
keywords = "discrimination • ethnicity • programmes • social exclusion • supervision",
author = "David Smith and Adam Calverley and Bankole Cole and Gurpreet Kaur and Sam Lewis and Peter Raynor and Soheila Sadeghi and Maurice Vanstone and Ali Wardak",
year = "2006",
month = mar,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0264550506060863",
language = "English",
volume = "53",
pages = "24--37",
journal = "Probation Journal",
issn = "0264-5505",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Black and Asian probationers : implications of the Home Office study.

AU - Smith, David

AU - Calverley, Adam

AU - Cole, Bankole

AU - Kaur, Gurpreet

AU - Lewis, Sam

AU - Raynor, Peter

AU - Sadeghi, Soheila

AU - Vanstone, Maurice

AU - Wardak, Ali

PY - 2006/3/1

Y1 - 2006/3/1

N2 - This article presents the main findings of a survey of Black, Asian and mixed heritage men supervised by the probation service in 2001-2003. It discusses the long-standing concern that minority ethnic groups may be subject to discriminatory treatment in the criminal justice system, and examines the probation service’s response to this concern. In the presentation and discussion of the findings, comparisons are made where possible with predominantly white probation samples. These suggest that minority ethnic offenders in the sample had received the same community sentences as white offenders with higher levels of criminogenic need. The possible meanings of this finding are explored, along with the implications of respondents’ views of what constitutes helpful probation practice.

AB - This article presents the main findings of a survey of Black, Asian and mixed heritage men supervised by the probation service in 2001-2003. It discusses the long-standing concern that minority ethnic groups may be subject to discriminatory treatment in the criminal justice system, and examines the probation service’s response to this concern. In the presentation and discussion of the findings, comparisons are made where possible with predominantly white probation samples. These suggest that minority ethnic offenders in the sample had received the same community sentences as white offenders with higher levels of criminogenic need. The possible meanings of this finding are explored, along with the implications of respondents’ views of what constitutes helpful probation practice.

KW - discrimination • ethnicity • programmes • social exclusion • supervision

U2 - 10.1177/0264550506060863

DO - 10.1177/0264550506060863

M3 - Journal article

VL - 53

SP - 24

EP - 37

JO - Probation Journal

JF - Probation Journal

SN - 0264-5505

IS - 1

ER -