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    Rights statement: The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Marketing Theory, 18 (3), 2018, © SAGE Publications Ltd, 2018 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Marketing Theory page: http://journals.sagepub.com/home/mtq on SAGE Journals Online: http://journals.sagepub.com/

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Bodysnatching in the marketplace: Market-focused health activism and compelling narratives of dys-appearance

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Bodysnatching in the marketplace : Market-focused health activism and compelling narratives of dys-appearance. / Cronin, James Martin; Hopkinson, Gillian Clare.

In: Marketing Theory, Vol. 18, No. 3, 09.2018, p. 269-286.

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@article{418db276a15d4e2f96bc2a876e31620a,
title = "Bodysnatching in the marketplace: Market-focused health activism and compelling narratives of dys-appearance",
abstract = "This article theorizes how market-focused health activism catalyses market change through revealing the ill-effects that consumers{\textquoteright} conformity with market-shaped expectations and ideals has on their bodies and embodied lives. An understanding of this activism is developed by analysing a vicarious form of {\textquoteleft}bodily dys-appearance{\textquoteright} which is used in Jamie Oliver{\textquoteright}s televised documentary,Sugar Rush (2015), to narratively provoke corporeal anxieties among audiences. In our analysis, we borrow tropes from the science fiction film, Invasion of the Body Snatchers, to interpret themes centred on a threat, a victim and a hero. We argue that market-focused health activism problematizes the neo-liberal logic of personal responsibility and promotes market intervention as the only means to insulate and safeguard the body from harm. Where extant theorization of consumers{\textquoteright} antagonism towards the market hinges mostly on politically or intellectually motivated resistance, this article demonstrates how somatically oriented concerns operate alternatively to invoke activism.",
keywords = "Activism, bodily dys-appearance, consumer subjectivity, food, health, Jamie Oliver, narrative, neo-liberalism",
author = "Cronin, {James Martin} and Hopkinson, {Gillian Clare}",
note = "The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Marketing Theory, 18 (3), 2018, {\textcopyright} SAGE Publications Ltd, 2018 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Marketing Theory page: http://journals.sagepub.com/home/mtq on SAGE Journals Online: http://journals.sagepub.com/ ",
year = "2018",
month = sep,
doi = "10.1177/1470593117740754",
language = "English",
volume = "18",
pages = "269--286",
journal = "Marketing Theory",
issn = "1470-5931",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Bodysnatching in the marketplace

T2 - Market-focused health activism and compelling narratives of dys-appearance

AU - Cronin, James Martin

AU - Hopkinson, Gillian Clare

N1 - The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Marketing Theory, 18 (3), 2018, © SAGE Publications Ltd, 2018 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Marketing Theory page: http://journals.sagepub.com/home/mtq on SAGE Journals Online: http://journals.sagepub.com/

PY - 2018/9

Y1 - 2018/9

N2 - This article theorizes how market-focused health activism catalyses market change through revealing the ill-effects that consumers’ conformity with market-shaped expectations and ideals has on their bodies and embodied lives. An understanding of this activism is developed by analysing a vicarious form of ‘bodily dys-appearance’ which is used in Jamie Oliver’s televised documentary,Sugar Rush (2015), to narratively provoke corporeal anxieties among audiences. In our analysis, we borrow tropes from the science fiction film, Invasion of the Body Snatchers, to interpret themes centred on a threat, a victim and a hero. We argue that market-focused health activism problematizes the neo-liberal logic of personal responsibility and promotes market intervention as the only means to insulate and safeguard the body from harm. Where extant theorization of consumers’ antagonism towards the market hinges mostly on politically or intellectually motivated resistance, this article demonstrates how somatically oriented concerns operate alternatively to invoke activism.

AB - This article theorizes how market-focused health activism catalyses market change through revealing the ill-effects that consumers’ conformity with market-shaped expectations and ideals has on their bodies and embodied lives. An understanding of this activism is developed by analysing a vicarious form of ‘bodily dys-appearance’ which is used in Jamie Oliver’s televised documentary,Sugar Rush (2015), to narratively provoke corporeal anxieties among audiences. In our analysis, we borrow tropes from the science fiction film, Invasion of the Body Snatchers, to interpret themes centred on a threat, a victim and a hero. We argue that market-focused health activism problematizes the neo-liberal logic of personal responsibility and promotes market intervention as the only means to insulate and safeguard the body from harm. Where extant theorization of consumers’ antagonism towards the market hinges mostly on politically or intellectually motivated resistance, this article demonstrates how somatically oriented concerns operate alternatively to invoke activism.

KW - Activism

KW - bodily dys-appearance

KW - consumer subjectivity

KW - food

KW - health

KW - Jamie Oliver

KW - narrative

KW - neo-liberalism

U2 - 10.1177/1470593117740754

DO - 10.1177/1470593117740754

M3 - Journal article

VL - 18

SP - 269

EP - 286

JO - Marketing Theory

JF - Marketing Theory

SN - 1470-5931

IS - 3

ER -