Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Building a Social Mandate for Climate Action

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Building a Social Mandate for Climate Action: Lessons from COVID-19

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

Published

Standard

Building a Social Mandate for Climate Action : Lessons from COVID-19. / Howarth, C.; Bryant, P.; Corner, A.; Fankhauser, S.; Gouldson, A.; Whitmarsh, L.; Willis, R.

In: Environmental and Resource Economics, Vol. 76, 01.08.2020, p. 1107-1115.

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Howarth, C, Bryant, P, Corner, A, Fankhauser, S, Gouldson, A, Whitmarsh, L & Willis, R 2020, 'Building a Social Mandate for Climate Action: Lessons from COVID-19', Environmental and Resource Economics, vol. 76, pp. 1107-1115. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10640-020-00446-9

APA

Howarth, C., Bryant, P., Corner, A., Fankhauser, S., Gouldson, A., Whitmarsh, L., & Willis, R. (2020). Building a Social Mandate for Climate Action: Lessons from COVID-19. Environmental and Resource Economics, 76, 1107-1115. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10640-020-00446-9

Vancouver

Howarth C, Bryant P, Corner A, Fankhauser S, Gouldson A, Whitmarsh L et al. Building a Social Mandate for Climate Action: Lessons from COVID-19. Environmental and Resource Economics. 2020 Aug 1;76:1107-1115. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10640-020-00446-9

Author

Howarth, C. ; Bryant, P. ; Corner, A. ; Fankhauser, S. ; Gouldson, A. ; Whitmarsh, L. ; Willis, R. / Building a Social Mandate for Climate Action : Lessons from COVID-19. In: Environmental and Resource Economics. 2020 ; Vol. 76. pp. 1107-1115.

Bibtex

@article{24b032de345a4a599916c132e598775d,
title = "Building a Social Mandate for Climate Action: Lessons from COVID-19",
abstract = "The COVID-19 imposed lockdown has led to a number of temporary environmental side effects (reduced global emissions, cleaner air, less noise), that the climate community has aspired to achieve over a number of decades. However, these benefits have been achieved at a massive cost to welfare and the economy. This commentary draws lessons from the COVID-19 crisis for climate change. It discusses whether there are more sustainable ways of achieving these benefits, as part of a more desirable, low carbon resilient future, in a more planned, inclusive and less disruptive way. In order to achieve this, we argue for a clearer social contract between citizens and the state. We discuss how COVID-19 has demonstrated that behaviours can change abruptly, that these changes come at a cost, that we need a 'social mandate' to ensure these changes remain in the long-term, and that science plays an important role in informing this process. We suggest that deliberative engagement mechanisms, such as citizens' assemblies and juries, could be a powerful way to build a social mandate for climate action post-COVID-19. This would enable behaviour changes to become more accepted, embedded and bearable in the long-term and provide the basis for future climate action.",
keywords = "Behaviour change, Climate change, COVID-19, Deliberative governance, Social mandate, Air cleaners, Sustainable development, Behaviour changes, Future climate, Global emissions, Low carbon, Side effect, Social contract",
author = "C. Howarth and P. Bryant and A. Corner and S. Fankhauser and A. Gouldson and L. Whitmarsh and R. Willis",
year = "2020",
month = aug,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s10640-020-00446-9",
language = "English",
volume = "76",
pages = "1107--1115",
journal = "Environmental and Resource Economics",
issn = "0924-6460",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Building a Social Mandate for Climate Action

T2 - Lessons from COVID-19

AU - Howarth, C.

AU - Bryant, P.

AU - Corner, A.

AU - Fankhauser, S.

AU - Gouldson, A.

AU - Whitmarsh, L.

AU - Willis, R.

PY - 2020/8/1

Y1 - 2020/8/1

N2 - The COVID-19 imposed lockdown has led to a number of temporary environmental side effects (reduced global emissions, cleaner air, less noise), that the climate community has aspired to achieve over a number of decades. However, these benefits have been achieved at a massive cost to welfare and the economy. This commentary draws lessons from the COVID-19 crisis for climate change. It discusses whether there are more sustainable ways of achieving these benefits, as part of a more desirable, low carbon resilient future, in a more planned, inclusive and less disruptive way. In order to achieve this, we argue for a clearer social contract between citizens and the state. We discuss how COVID-19 has demonstrated that behaviours can change abruptly, that these changes come at a cost, that we need a 'social mandate' to ensure these changes remain in the long-term, and that science plays an important role in informing this process. We suggest that deliberative engagement mechanisms, such as citizens' assemblies and juries, could be a powerful way to build a social mandate for climate action post-COVID-19. This would enable behaviour changes to become more accepted, embedded and bearable in the long-term and provide the basis for future climate action.

AB - The COVID-19 imposed lockdown has led to a number of temporary environmental side effects (reduced global emissions, cleaner air, less noise), that the climate community has aspired to achieve over a number of decades. However, these benefits have been achieved at a massive cost to welfare and the economy. This commentary draws lessons from the COVID-19 crisis for climate change. It discusses whether there are more sustainable ways of achieving these benefits, as part of a more desirable, low carbon resilient future, in a more planned, inclusive and less disruptive way. In order to achieve this, we argue for a clearer social contract between citizens and the state. We discuss how COVID-19 has demonstrated that behaviours can change abruptly, that these changes come at a cost, that we need a 'social mandate' to ensure these changes remain in the long-term, and that science plays an important role in informing this process. We suggest that deliberative engagement mechanisms, such as citizens' assemblies and juries, could be a powerful way to build a social mandate for climate action post-COVID-19. This would enable behaviour changes to become more accepted, embedded and bearable in the long-term and provide the basis for future climate action.

KW - Behaviour change

KW - Climate change

KW - COVID-19

KW - Deliberative governance

KW - Social mandate

KW - Air cleaners

KW - Sustainable development

KW - Behaviour changes

KW - Future climate

KW - Global emissions

KW - Low carbon

KW - Side effect

KW - Social contract

U2 - 10.1007/s10640-020-00446-9

DO - 10.1007/s10640-020-00446-9

M3 - Journal article

VL - 76

SP - 1107

EP - 1115

JO - Environmental and Resource Economics

JF - Environmental and Resource Economics

SN - 0924-6460

ER -