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Can improved canopy light transmission ameliorate loss of photosynthetic efficiency in the shade An investigation of natural variation in Sorghum bicolor

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Can improved canopy light transmission ameliorate loss of photosynthetic efficiency in the shade An investigation of natural variation in Sorghum bicolor. / Jaikumar, N.S.; Stutz, S.S.; Fernandes, S.B.; Leakey, A.D.B.; Bernacchi, C.J.; Brown, P.J.; Long, S.P.

In: Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol. 72, No. 13, 22.06.2021, p. 4965-4980.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Jaikumar, NS, Stutz, SS, Fernandes, SB, Leakey, ADB, Bernacchi, CJ, Brown, PJ & Long, SP 2021, 'Can improved canopy light transmission ameliorate loss of photosynthetic efficiency in the shade An investigation of natural variation in Sorghum bicolor', Journal of Experimental Botany, vol. 72, no. 13, pp. 4965-4980. https://doi.org/10.1093/jxb/erab176

APA

Jaikumar, N. S., Stutz, S. S., Fernandes, S. B., Leakey, A. D. B., Bernacchi, C. J., Brown, P. J., & Long, S. P. (2021). Can improved canopy light transmission ameliorate loss of photosynthetic efficiency in the shade An investigation of natural variation in Sorghum bicolor. Journal of Experimental Botany, 72(13), 4965-4980. https://doi.org/10.1093/jxb/erab176

Vancouver

Jaikumar NS, Stutz SS, Fernandes SB, Leakey ADB, Bernacchi CJ, Brown PJ et al. Can improved canopy light transmission ameliorate loss of photosynthetic efficiency in the shade An investigation of natural variation in Sorghum bicolor. Journal of Experimental Botany. 2021 Jun 22;72(13):4965-4980. https://doi.org/10.1093/jxb/erab176

Author

Jaikumar, N.S. ; Stutz, S.S. ; Fernandes, S.B. ; Leakey, A.D.B. ; Bernacchi, C.J. ; Brown, P.J. ; Long, S.P. / Can improved canopy light transmission ameliorate loss of photosynthetic efficiency in the shade An investigation of natural variation in Sorghum bicolor. In: Journal of Experimental Botany. 2021 ; Vol. 72, No. 13. pp. 4965-4980.

Bibtex

@article{4191f82b035d401db24b18f7397f3fb6,
title = "Can improved canopy light transmission ameliorate loss of photosynthetic efficiency in the shade An investigation of natural variation in Sorghum bicolor",
abstract = "Previous studies have found that maximum quantum yield of CO2 assimilation (φCO2,max,app) declines in lower canopies of maize and miscanthus, a maladaptive response to self-shading. These observations were limited to single genotypes, leaving it unclear whether the maladaptive shade response is a general property of this C4 grass tribe, the Andropogoneae. We explored the generality of this maladaptation by testing the hypothesis that erect leaf forms (erectophiles), which allow more light into the lower canopy, suffer less of a decline in photosynthetic efficiency than drooping leaf (planophile) forms. On average, φCO2,max,app declined 27% in lower canopy leaves across 35 accessions, but the decline was over twice as great in planophiles than in erectophiles. The loss of photosynthetic efficiency involved a decoupling between electron transport and assimilation. This was not associated with increased bundle sheath leakage, based on 13C measurements. In both planophiles and erectophiles, shaded leaves had greater leaf absorptivity and lower activities of key C4 enzymes than sun leaves. The erectophile form is considered more productive because it allows a more effective distribution of light through the canopy to support photosynthesis. We show that in sorghum, it provides a second benefit, maintenance of higher φCO2,max,app to support efficient use of that light resource. ",
keywords = "C4photosynthesis, crop canopy architecture, food security, leaf form, quantum efficiency, stomata, water use efficiency",
author = "N.S. Jaikumar and S.S. Stutz and S.B. Fernandes and A.D.B. Leakey and C.J. Bernacchi and P.J. Brown and S.P. Long",
year = "2021",
month = jun,
day = "22",
doi = "10.1093/jxb/erab176",
language = "English",
volume = "72",
pages = "4965--4980",
journal = "Journal of Experimental Botany",
issn = "0022-0957",
publisher = "OXFORD UNIV PRESS",
number = "13",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Can improved canopy light transmission ameliorate loss of photosynthetic efficiency in the shade An investigation of natural variation in Sorghum bicolor

AU - Jaikumar, N.S.

AU - Stutz, S.S.

AU - Fernandes, S.B.

AU - Leakey, A.D.B.

AU - Bernacchi, C.J.

AU - Brown, P.J.

AU - Long, S.P.

PY - 2021/6/22

Y1 - 2021/6/22

N2 - Previous studies have found that maximum quantum yield of CO2 assimilation (φCO2,max,app) declines in lower canopies of maize and miscanthus, a maladaptive response to self-shading. These observations were limited to single genotypes, leaving it unclear whether the maladaptive shade response is a general property of this C4 grass tribe, the Andropogoneae. We explored the generality of this maladaptation by testing the hypothesis that erect leaf forms (erectophiles), which allow more light into the lower canopy, suffer less of a decline in photosynthetic efficiency than drooping leaf (planophile) forms. On average, φCO2,max,app declined 27% in lower canopy leaves across 35 accessions, but the decline was over twice as great in planophiles than in erectophiles. The loss of photosynthetic efficiency involved a decoupling between electron transport and assimilation. This was not associated with increased bundle sheath leakage, based on 13C measurements. In both planophiles and erectophiles, shaded leaves had greater leaf absorptivity and lower activities of key C4 enzymes than sun leaves. The erectophile form is considered more productive because it allows a more effective distribution of light through the canopy to support photosynthesis. We show that in sorghum, it provides a second benefit, maintenance of higher φCO2,max,app to support efficient use of that light resource.

AB - Previous studies have found that maximum quantum yield of CO2 assimilation (φCO2,max,app) declines in lower canopies of maize and miscanthus, a maladaptive response to self-shading. These observations were limited to single genotypes, leaving it unclear whether the maladaptive shade response is a general property of this C4 grass tribe, the Andropogoneae. We explored the generality of this maladaptation by testing the hypothesis that erect leaf forms (erectophiles), which allow more light into the lower canopy, suffer less of a decline in photosynthetic efficiency than drooping leaf (planophile) forms. On average, φCO2,max,app declined 27% in lower canopy leaves across 35 accessions, but the decline was over twice as great in planophiles than in erectophiles. The loss of photosynthetic efficiency involved a decoupling between electron transport and assimilation. This was not associated with increased bundle sheath leakage, based on 13C measurements. In both planophiles and erectophiles, shaded leaves had greater leaf absorptivity and lower activities of key C4 enzymes than sun leaves. The erectophile form is considered more productive because it allows a more effective distribution of light through the canopy to support photosynthesis. We show that in sorghum, it provides a second benefit, maintenance of higher φCO2,max,app to support efficient use of that light resource.

KW - C4photosynthesis

KW - crop canopy architecture

KW - food security

KW - leaf form

KW - quantum efficiency

KW - stomata

KW - water use efficiency

U2 - 10.1093/jxb/erab176

DO - 10.1093/jxb/erab176

M3 - Journal article

VL - 72

SP - 4965

EP - 4980

JO - Journal of Experimental Botany

JF - Journal of Experimental Botany

SN - 0022-0957

IS - 13

ER -