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    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Infant Behavior and Development. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Infant Behavior and Development, 65, 2021 DOI: 10.1016/j.infbeh.2021.101631

    Accepted author manuscript, 2.9 MB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 17/02/22

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Children's scale errors and object processing: Early evidence for cross-cultural differences

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

E-pub ahead of print
Article number101631
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>30/11/2021
<mark>Journal</mark>Infant Behavior and Development
Volume65
Number of pages12
Publication StatusE-pub ahead of print
Early online date17/08/21
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Scale errors are observed when young children make mistakes by attempting to put their bodies into miniature versions of everyday objects. Such errors have been argued to arise from children's insufficient integration of size into their object representations. The current study investigated whether Japanese and UK children's (18–24 months old, N = 80) visual exploration in a categorization task related to their scale error production. UK children who showed greater local processing made more scale errors, whereas Japanese children, who overall showed greater global processing, showed no such relationship. These results raise the possibility that children's suppression of scale errors emerges not from attention to size per se, but from a critical integration of global (i.e., size) and local (i.e., object features) information during object processing, and provide evidence that this mechanism differs cross-culturally.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Infant Behavior and Development. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Infant Behavior and Development, 65, 2021 DOI: 10.1016/j.infbeh.2021.101631