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    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in British Journal of Religious Education on 12/06/2018, available online: http://wwww.tandfonline.com/10.1080/01416200.2018.1478276

    Accepted author manuscript, 806 KB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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Choosing a Faith School in Leicester: admissions criteria, diversity and choice

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

E-pub ahead of print
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>12/06/2018
<mark>Journal</mark>British Journal of Religious Education
Issue number2
Volume42
Number of pages18
Pages (from-to)224-241
Publication StatusE-pub ahead of print
Early online date12/06/18
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Religion in Britain is in overall decline and ‘no religion’ is growing, but one-third of schools in the State sector in England and Wales are ‘schools with a religious designation’ (‘faith schools’). Historically, these were Protestant and Catholic Church schools, but new faith schools have been established by Churches and other faiths. Governments of all parties have encouraged this development, chiefly on the grounds of increased parental choice and improved quality.
The research presented here provides evidence about the operation of faith schools in the English city of Leicester in 2016, particularly from the perspective of those choosing a school. The main objectives are (1) to indicate the diversity of faith schools, (2) to show how they present
themselves to those looking for a school: their admission requirements and level of educational attainment and (3) to reflect on the claim that faith schooling offers more and better choice and quality. Leicester is selected for its size and diversity; it is small enough to study with the
resources available to us and is one of the most multi-ethnic and multifaith urban areas in England. Research was carried out between February and July 2016 and offers a snapshot from that year.

Bibliographic note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in British Journal of Religious Education on 12/06/2018, available online: http://wwww.tandfonline.com/10.1080/01416200.2018.1478276