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Comparative assessment of maize, finger millet and sorghum for household food security in the face of increasing climatic risk

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Comparative assessment of maize, finger millet and sorghum for household food security in the face of increasing climatic risk. / Rurinda, J.; Mapfumo, P.; van Wijk, M. T. et al.

In: European Journal of Agronomy, Vol. 55, 04.2014, p. 29-41.

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Rurinda, J, Mapfumo, P, van Wijk, MT, Mtambanengwe, F, Rufino, MC, Chikowo, R & Giller, KE 2014, 'Comparative assessment of maize, finger millet and sorghum for household food security in the face of increasing climatic risk', European Journal of Agronomy, vol. 55, pp. 29-41. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eja.2013.12.009

APA

Rurinda, J., Mapfumo, P., van Wijk, M. T., Mtambanengwe, F., Rufino, M. C., Chikowo, R., & Giller, K. E. (2014). Comparative assessment of maize, finger millet and sorghum for household food security in the face of increasing climatic risk. European Journal of Agronomy, 55, 29-41. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eja.2013.12.009

Vancouver

Rurinda J, Mapfumo P, van Wijk MT, Mtambanengwe F, Rufino MC, Chikowo R et al. Comparative assessment of maize, finger millet and sorghum for household food security in the face of increasing climatic risk. European Journal of Agronomy. 2014 Apr;55:29-41. Epub 2014 Feb 1. doi: 10.1016/j.eja.2013.12.009

Author

Rurinda, J. ; Mapfumo, P. ; van Wijk, M. T. et al. / Comparative assessment of maize, finger millet and sorghum for household food security in the face of increasing climatic risk. In: European Journal of Agronomy. 2014 ; Vol. 55. pp. 29-41.

Bibtex

@article{5497c6c5a7584fcc834afa30818b2b20,
title = "Comparative assessment of maize, finger millet and sorghum for household food security in the face of increasing climatic risk",
abstract = "Questions as to which crop to grow, where, when and with what management, will be increasingly challenging for farmers in the face of a changing climate. The objective of this study was to evaluate emergence, yield and financial benefits of maize, finger millet and sorghum, planted at different dates and managed with variable soil nutrient inputs in order to develop adaptation options for stabilizing food production and income for smallholder households in the face of climate change and variability. Field experiments with maize, finger millet and sorghum were conducted in farmers' fields in Makoni and Hwedza districts in eastern Zimbabwe for three seasons: 2009/10, 2010/11 and 2011/12. Three fertilization rates: high (90kgNha-1, 26kgPha-1, 7tha-1 manure), low (35kgNha-1, 14kgPha-1, 3tha-1 manure) and a control (zero fertilization); and three planting dates: early, normal and late, were compared. Crop emergence for the unfertilized finger millet and sorghum was 70% for the fertilized treatments. In contrast, the emergence for maize (a medium-maturity hybrid cultivar, SC635), was >80% regardless of the amount of fertilizer applied. Maize yield was greater than that of finger millet and sorghum, also in the season (2010/11) which had poor rainfall distribution. Maize yielded 5.4tha-1 compared with 3.1tha-1 for finger millet and 3.3tha-1 for sorghum for the early plantings in the 2009/10 rainfall season in Makoni, a site with relatively fertile soils. In the poorer 2010/11 season, early planted maize yielded 2.4tha-1, against 1.6tha-1 for finger millet and 0.4tha-1 for sorghum in Makoni. Similar yield trends were observed on the nutrient-depleted soils in Hwedza, although yields were less than those observed in Makoni. All crops yielded significantly more with increasing rates of fertilization when planting was done early or in what farmers considered the 'normal window'. Crops planted early or during the normal planting window gave comparable yields that were greater than yields of late-planted crops. Water productivity for each crop planted early or during the normal window increased with increase in the amount of fertilizer applied, but differed between crop type. Maize had the highest water productivity (8.0kgdrymattermm-1ha-1) followed by sorghum (4.9kgmm-1ha-1) and then finger millet (4.6kgmm-1ha-1) when a high fertilizer rate was applied to the early-planted crop. Marginal rates of return for maize production were greater for the high fertilization rate (>50%) than for the low rate (100%) than for the high rate (",
keywords = "Climate change adaptation, Climate variability, Crop diversification, Nutrient management, Planting date",
author = "J. Rurinda and P. Mapfumo and {van Wijk}, {M. T.} and F. Mtambanengwe and Rufino, {M. C.} and R. Chikowo and Giller, {K. E.}",
year = "2014",
month = apr,
doi = "10.1016/j.eja.2013.12.009",
language = "English",
volume = "55",
pages = "29--41",
journal = "European Journal of Agronomy",
issn = "1161-0301",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparative assessment of maize, finger millet and sorghum for household food security in the face of increasing climatic risk

AU - Rurinda, J.

AU - Mapfumo, P.

AU - van Wijk, M. T.

AU - Mtambanengwe, F.

AU - Rufino, M. C.

AU - Chikowo, R.

AU - Giller, K. E.

PY - 2014/4

Y1 - 2014/4

N2 - Questions as to which crop to grow, where, when and with what management, will be increasingly challenging for farmers in the face of a changing climate. The objective of this study was to evaluate emergence, yield and financial benefits of maize, finger millet and sorghum, planted at different dates and managed with variable soil nutrient inputs in order to develop adaptation options for stabilizing food production and income for smallholder households in the face of climate change and variability. Field experiments with maize, finger millet and sorghum were conducted in farmers' fields in Makoni and Hwedza districts in eastern Zimbabwe for three seasons: 2009/10, 2010/11 and 2011/12. Three fertilization rates: high (90kgNha-1, 26kgPha-1, 7tha-1 manure), low (35kgNha-1, 14kgPha-1, 3tha-1 manure) and a control (zero fertilization); and three planting dates: early, normal and late, were compared. Crop emergence for the unfertilized finger millet and sorghum was 70% for the fertilized treatments. In contrast, the emergence for maize (a medium-maturity hybrid cultivar, SC635), was >80% regardless of the amount of fertilizer applied. Maize yield was greater than that of finger millet and sorghum, also in the season (2010/11) which had poor rainfall distribution. Maize yielded 5.4tha-1 compared with 3.1tha-1 for finger millet and 3.3tha-1 for sorghum for the early plantings in the 2009/10 rainfall season in Makoni, a site with relatively fertile soils. In the poorer 2010/11 season, early planted maize yielded 2.4tha-1, against 1.6tha-1 for finger millet and 0.4tha-1 for sorghum in Makoni. Similar yield trends were observed on the nutrient-depleted soils in Hwedza, although yields were less than those observed in Makoni. All crops yielded significantly more with increasing rates of fertilization when planting was done early or in what farmers considered the 'normal window'. Crops planted early or during the normal planting window gave comparable yields that were greater than yields of late-planted crops. Water productivity for each crop planted early or during the normal window increased with increase in the amount of fertilizer applied, but differed between crop type. Maize had the highest water productivity (8.0kgdrymattermm-1ha-1) followed by sorghum (4.9kgmm-1ha-1) and then finger millet (4.6kgmm-1ha-1) when a high fertilizer rate was applied to the early-planted crop. Marginal rates of return for maize production were greater for the high fertilization rate (>50%) than for the low rate (100%) than for the high rate (

AB - Questions as to which crop to grow, where, when and with what management, will be increasingly challenging for farmers in the face of a changing climate. The objective of this study was to evaluate emergence, yield and financial benefits of maize, finger millet and sorghum, planted at different dates and managed with variable soil nutrient inputs in order to develop adaptation options for stabilizing food production and income for smallholder households in the face of climate change and variability. Field experiments with maize, finger millet and sorghum were conducted in farmers' fields in Makoni and Hwedza districts in eastern Zimbabwe for three seasons: 2009/10, 2010/11 and 2011/12. Three fertilization rates: high (90kgNha-1, 26kgPha-1, 7tha-1 manure), low (35kgNha-1, 14kgPha-1, 3tha-1 manure) and a control (zero fertilization); and three planting dates: early, normal and late, were compared. Crop emergence for the unfertilized finger millet and sorghum was 70% for the fertilized treatments. In contrast, the emergence for maize (a medium-maturity hybrid cultivar, SC635), was >80% regardless of the amount of fertilizer applied. Maize yield was greater than that of finger millet and sorghum, also in the season (2010/11) which had poor rainfall distribution. Maize yielded 5.4tha-1 compared with 3.1tha-1 for finger millet and 3.3tha-1 for sorghum for the early plantings in the 2009/10 rainfall season in Makoni, a site with relatively fertile soils. In the poorer 2010/11 season, early planted maize yielded 2.4tha-1, against 1.6tha-1 for finger millet and 0.4tha-1 for sorghum in Makoni. Similar yield trends were observed on the nutrient-depleted soils in Hwedza, although yields were less than those observed in Makoni. All crops yielded significantly more with increasing rates of fertilization when planting was done early or in what farmers considered the 'normal window'. Crops planted early or during the normal planting window gave comparable yields that were greater than yields of late-planted crops. Water productivity for each crop planted early or during the normal window increased with increase in the amount of fertilizer applied, but differed between crop type. Maize had the highest water productivity (8.0kgdrymattermm-1ha-1) followed by sorghum (4.9kgmm-1ha-1) and then finger millet (4.6kgmm-1ha-1) when a high fertilizer rate was applied to the early-planted crop. Marginal rates of return for maize production were greater for the high fertilization rate (>50%) than for the low rate (100%) than for the high rate (

KW - Climate change adaptation

KW - Climate variability

KW - Crop diversification

KW - Nutrient management

KW - Planting date

U2 - 10.1016/j.eja.2013.12.009

DO - 10.1016/j.eja.2013.12.009

M3 - Journal article

AN - SCOPUS:84893388910

VL - 55

SP - 29

EP - 41

JO - European Journal of Agronomy

JF - European Journal of Agronomy

SN - 1161-0301

ER -