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Conservation implications of the link between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning.

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Conservation implications of the link between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. / Hector, A.; Joshi, J.; Lawler, S.; Spehn, E. M.; Wilby, Andrew.

In: Oecologia, Vol. 129, No. 4, 12.2001, p. 624-628.

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Hector, A, Joshi, J, Lawler, S, Spehn, EM & Wilby, A 2001, 'Conservation implications of the link between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning.', Oecologia, vol. 129, no. 4, pp. 624-628. https://doi.org/10.1007/s004420100759

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Hector, A. ; Joshi, J. ; Lawler, S. ; Spehn, E. M. ; Wilby, Andrew. / Conservation implications of the link between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. In: Oecologia. 2001 ; Vol. 129, No. 4. pp. 624-628.

Bibtex

@article{5c04a9db10ae4562ac6d2265468d2d42,
title = "Conservation implications of the link between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning.",
abstract = "The relationship between biodiversity and individual ecosystem processes is often asymptotic, saturating at relatively low levels, with some species contributing more strongly than others. This has cast doubt on arguments for conservation based on maintenance of the functioning of ecosystems. However, we argue that the link between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning is an important additional argument for conservation for several reasons. (1) Although species differ in importance to ecosystem processes, we do not believe that this argues for preservation of just a few species for two reasons: first, it is nearly impossible to identify all species important to the numerous systems and processes on which humans depend; second, the important species themselves may depend on an unknown number of other species in their communities. (2) Arguments for conservation based on ecosystem functioning are complementary to other utilitarian, ethical and aesthetic justifications. No single reason will convince all people or protect all species, however the combination produces a strong case for conservation of biodiversity. (3) Even if the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning is asymptotic at local spatial scales and in the short term, effects of biodiversity loss are likely to be important at larger temporal and spatial scales. (4) Initial arguments for the importance of biodiversity for ecosystem functioning were largely based on a precautionary approach (points 1-3). However, we are now moving to a scientific position based on accumulating experimental evidence. The future challenge is the integration of this scientific research with policy.",
keywords = "Diversity, Species richness, Ecosystem processes, Precautionary principle, Conservation ecology",
author = "A. Hector and J. Joshi and S. Lawler and Spehn, {E. M.} and Andrew Wilby",
year = "2001",
month = dec,
doi = "10.1007/s004420100759",
language = "English",
volume = "129",
pages = "624--628",
journal = "Oecologia",
issn = "0029-8549",
publisher = "Springer-Verlag",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Conservation implications of the link between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning.

AU - Hector, A.

AU - Joshi, J.

AU - Lawler, S.

AU - Spehn, E. M.

AU - Wilby, Andrew

PY - 2001/12

Y1 - 2001/12

N2 - The relationship between biodiversity and individual ecosystem processes is often asymptotic, saturating at relatively low levels, with some species contributing more strongly than others. This has cast doubt on arguments for conservation based on maintenance of the functioning of ecosystems. However, we argue that the link between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning is an important additional argument for conservation for several reasons. (1) Although species differ in importance to ecosystem processes, we do not believe that this argues for preservation of just a few species for two reasons: first, it is nearly impossible to identify all species important to the numerous systems and processes on which humans depend; second, the important species themselves may depend on an unknown number of other species in their communities. (2) Arguments for conservation based on ecosystem functioning are complementary to other utilitarian, ethical and aesthetic justifications. No single reason will convince all people or protect all species, however the combination produces a strong case for conservation of biodiversity. (3) Even if the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning is asymptotic at local spatial scales and in the short term, effects of biodiversity loss are likely to be important at larger temporal and spatial scales. (4) Initial arguments for the importance of biodiversity for ecosystem functioning were largely based on a precautionary approach (points 1-3). However, we are now moving to a scientific position based on accumulating experimental evidence. The future challenge is the integration of this scientific research with policy.

AB - The relationship between biodiversity and individual ecosystem processes is often asymptotic, saturating at relatively low levels, with some species contributing more strongly than others. This has cast doubt on arguments for conservation based on maintenance of the functioning of ecosystems. However, we argue that the link between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning is an important additional argument for conservation for several reasons. (1) Although species differ in importance to ecosystem processes, we do not believe that this argues for preservation of just a few species for two reasons: first, it is nearly impossible to identify all species important to the numerous systems and processes on which humans depend; second, the important species themselves may depend on an unknown number of other species in their communities. (2) Arguments for conservation based on ecosystem functioning are complementary to other utilitarian, ethical and aesthetic justifications. No single reason will convince all people or protect all species, however the combination produces a strong case for conservation of biodiversity. (3) Even if the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning is asymptotic at local spatial scales and in the short term, effects of biodiversity loss are likely to be important at larger temporal and spatial scales. (4) Initial arguments for the importance of biodiversity for ecosystem functioning were largely based on a precautionary approach (points 1-3). However, we are now moving to a scientific position based on accumulating experimental evidence. The future challenge is the integration of this scientific research with policy.

KW - Diversity

KW - Species richness

KW - Ecosystem processes

KW - Precautionary principle

KW - Conservation ecology

U2 - 10.1007/s004420100759

DO - 10.1007/s004420100759

M3 - Journal article

VL - 129

SP - 624

EP - 628

JO - Oecologia

JF - Oecologia

SN - 0029-8549

IS - 4

ER -