Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Critical leadership studies

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Critical leadership studies: a response to Learmonth and Morrell

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Published

Standard

Critical leadership studies : a response to Learmonth and Morrell. / Collinson, David Leonard.

In: Leadership, Vol. 13, No. 3, 01.07.2017, p. 272-284.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

APA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{c248b90271084fc5941b2900320cab99,
title = "Critical leadership studies: a response to Learmonth and Morrell",
abstract = "This article re-states the value of a dialectical approach to critical leadership studies: one that explicitly uses the {\textquoteleft}language of leadership{\textquoteright} to examine and illuminate workplace power and identity dynamics. Outlining an alternative view of what it means to be {\textquoteleft}critical{\textquoteright}, this response questions the dichotomizing tendency in Learmonth and Morrell{\textquoteright}s arguments and highlights their misrepresentation and misinterpretation of my 2014 article. Learmonth and Morrell{\textquoteright}s article shifts in different places between Marxist structuralism and mainstream voluntarism. Their proposal to replace the language of leadership with a Marxist binary of manager and worker all but precludes the possibility of a critical approach to leadership studies, and leaves little, if any, conceptual space for the study of leadership whatsoever. They also suggest that critical studies of leadership are not critical enough. Yet, paradoxically, their objections draw on conventional, voluntaristic and uncritical conceptions of both leaders and followers. Rather than reproduce and reinforce furtherdichotomies, future critical work on leadership would be better served, in my view, exploring the dialectical asymmetries, situated interrelations and intersecting practices of leaders and followers and managers and workers in all their ambiguous, paradoxical and contradictory forms.",
keywords = "Critical leadership studies, dialectics, dichotomization, mainstream voluntarism, Marxist binary, power , identity",
author = "Collinson, {David Leonard}",
note = "The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Leadership,13 (3), 2017, {\textcopyright} SAGE Publications Ltd, 2017 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Leadership page: http://journals.sagepub.com/home/LEA on SAGE Journals Online: http://journals.sagepub.com/",
year = "2017",
month = jul,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/1742715017694559",
language = "English",
volume = "13",
pages = "272--284",
journal = "Leadership",
issn = "1742-7150",
publisher = "SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Critical leadership studies

T2 - a response to Learmonth and Morrell

AU - Collinson, David Leonard

N1 - The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Leadership,13 (3), 2017, © SAGE Publications Ltd, 2017 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Leadership page: http://journals.sagepub.com/home/LEA on SAGE Journals Online: http://journals.sagepub.com/

PY - 2017/7/1

Y1 - 2017/7/1

N2 - This article re-states the value of a dialectical approach to critical leadership studies: one that explicitly uses the ‘language of leadership’ to examine and illuminate workplace power and identity dynamics. Outlining an alternative view of what it means to be ‘critical’, this response questions the dichotomizing tendency in Learmonth and Morrell’s arguments and highlights their misrepresentation and misinterpretation of my 2014 article. Learmonth and Morrell’s article shifts in different places between Marxist structuralism and mainstream voluntarism. Their proposal to replace the language of leadership with a Marxist binary of manager and worker all but precludes the possibility of a critical approach to leadership studies, and leaves little, if any, conceptual space for the study of leadership whatsoever. They also suggest that critical studies of leadership are not critical enough. Yet, paradoxically, their objections draw on conventional, voluntaristic and uncritical conceptions of both leaders and followers. Rather than reproduce and reinforce furtherdichotomies, future critical work on leadership would be better served, in my view, exploring the dialectical asymmetries, situated interrelations and intersecting practices of leaders and followers and managers and workers in all their ambiguous, paradoxical and contradictory forms.

AB - This article re-states the value of a dialectical approach to critical leadership studies: one that explicitly uses the ‘language of leadership’ to examine and illuminate workplace power and identity dynamics. Outlining an alternative view of what it means to be ‘critical’, this response questions the dichotomizing tendency in Learmonth and Morrell’s arguments and highlights their misrepresentation and misinterpretation of my 2014 article. Learmonth and Morrell’s article shifts in different places between Marxist structuralism and mainstream voluntarism. Their proposal to replace the language of leadership with a Marxist binary of manager and worker all but precludes the possibility of a critical approach to leadership studies, and leaves little, if any, conceptual space for the study of leadership whatsoever. They also suggest that critical studies of leadership are not critical enough. Yet, paradoxically, their objections draw on conventional, voluntaristic and uncritical conceptions of both leaders and followers. Rather than reproduce and reinforce furtherdichotomies, future critical work on leadership would be better served, in my view, exploring the dialectical asymmetries, situated interrelations and intersecting practices of leaders and followers and managers and workers in all their ambiguous, paradoxical and contradictory forms.

KW - Critical leadership studies

KW - dialectics

KW - dichotomization

KW - mainstream voluntarism

KW - Marxist binary

KW - power

KW - identity

U2 - 10.1177/1742715017694559

DO - 10.1177/1742715017694559

M3 - Journal article

VL - 13

SP - 272

EP - 284

JO - Leadership

JF - Leadership

SN - 1742-7150

IS - 3

ER -