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Deadly sins and corporate acquisitions

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Deadly sins and corporate acquisitions. / Schriber, S.; King, D.R.; Bauer, F.

In: Culture and Organization, Vol. 27, No. 1, 02.01.2021, p. 1-15.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Schriber, S, King, DR & Bauer, F 2021, 'Deadly sins and corporate acquisitions', Culture and Organization, vol. 27, no. 1, pp. 1-15. https://doi.org/10.1080/14759551.2019.1621311

APA

Schriber, S., King, D. R., & Bauer, F. (2021). Deadly sins and corporate acquisitions. Culture and Organization, 27(1), 1-15. https://doi.org/10.1080/14759551.2019.1621311

Vancouver

Schriber S, King DR, Bauer F. Deadly sins and corporate acquisitions. Culture and Organization. 2021 Jan 2;27(1):1-15. https://doi.org/10.1080/14759551.2019.1621311

Author

Schriber, S. ; King, D.R. ; Bauer, F. / Deadly sins and corporate acquisitions. In: Culture and Organization. 2021 ; Vol. 27, No. 1. pp. 1-15.

Bibtex

@article{e907bf620931478a95e09c720e176ca7,
title = "Deadly sins and corporate acquisitions",
abstract = "Although having grown significantly to constitute a strong influence in several fields of business research, research on corporate acquisitions still needs fresh voices. Research on acquisitions is dominated by functionalist studies searching for ways to improve financial outcomes. In contrast, this paper draws on a narrative approach to provide a new perspective to corporate acquisitions. We focus on decision-makers and how a metaphor that highlights human foibles connected to sins can offer a new understanding of corporate acquisitions. Engaging with acquisition literature and underpinning our argument with examples from well-known acquisitions, provides a new way of understanding commonly identified but socially unaccepted outcomes from acquisitions generally described as unintended and unwanted.",
keywords = "Acquisitions, corporeality, decision-makers, metaphor, narrative",
author = "S. Schriber and D.R. King and F. Bauer",
year = "2021",
month = jan,
day = "2",
doi = "10.1080/14759551.2019.1621311",
language = "English",
volume = "27",
pages = "1--15",
journal = "Culture and Organization",
issn = "1475-9551",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Deadly sins and corporate acquisitions

AU - Schriber, S.

AU - King, D.R.

AU - Bauer, F.

PY - 2021/1/2

Y1 - 2021/1/2

N2 - Although having grown significantly to constitute a strong influence in several fields of business research, research on corporate acquisitions still needs fresh voices. Research on acquisitions is dominated by functionalist studies searching for ways to improve financial outcomes. In contrast, this paper draws on a narrative approach to provide a new perspective to corporate acquisitions. We focus on decision-makers and how a metaphor that highlights human foibles connected to sins can offer a new understanding of corporate acquisitions. Engaging with acquisition literature and underpinning our argument with examples from well-known acquisitions, provides a new way of understanding commonly identified but socially unaccepted outcomes from acquisitions generally described as unintended and unwanted.

AB - Although having grown significantly to constitute a strong influence in several fields of business research, research on corporate acquisitions still needs fresh voices. Research on acquisitions is dominated by functionalist studies searching for ways to improve financial outcomes. In contrast, this paper draws on a narrative approach to provide a new perspective to corporate acquisitions. We focus on decision-makers and how a metaphor that highlights human foibles connected to sins can offer a new understanding of corporate acquisitions. Engaging with acquisition literature and underpinning our argument with examples from well-known acquisitions, provides a new way of understanding commonly identified but socially unaccepted outcomes from acquisitions generally described as unintended and unwanted.

KW - Acquisitions

KW - corporeality

KW - decision-makers

KW - metaphor

KW - narrative

U2 - 10.1080/14759551.2019.1621311

DO - 10.1080/14759551.2019.1621311

M3 - Journal article

VL - 27

SP - 1

EP - 15

JO - Culture and Organization

JF - Culture and Organization

SN - 1475-9551

IS - 1

ER -