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Decoupling the direct and indirect effects of nitrogen deposition on ecosystem function.

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Decoupling the direct and indirect effects of nitrogen deposition on ecosystem function. / Manning, Pete; Newington, John E.; Robson, Helen R.; Saunders, Mark; Eggers, Till; Bradford, Mark A.; Bardgett, Richard D.; Bonkowski, Michael; Ellis, Richard J.; Gange, Alan C.; Grayston, Susan J.; Kandeler, Ellen; Marhan, Sven; Reid, Eileen; Tscherko, Dagmar; Godfray, H. Charles J.; Rees, Mark.

In: Ecology Letters, Vol. 9, No. 9, 09.2006, p. 1015-1024.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Manning, P, Newington, JE, Robson, HR, Saunders, M, Eggers, T, Bradford, MA, Bardgett, RD, Bonkowski, M, Ellis, RJ, Gange, AC, Grayston, SJ, Kandeler, E, Marhan, S, Reid, E, Tscherko, D, Godfray, HCJ & Rees, M 2006, 'Decoupling the direct and indirect effects of nitrogen deposition on ecosystem function.', Ecology Letters, vol. 9, no. 9, pp. 1015-1024. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1461-0248.2006.00959.x

APA

Manning, P., Newington, J. E., Robson, H. R., Saunders, M., Eggers, T., Bradford, M. A., Bardgett, R. D., Bonkowski, M., Ellis, R. J., Gange, A. C., Grayston, S. J., Kandeler, E., Marhan, S., Reid, E., Tscherko, D., Godfray, H. C. J., & Rees, M. (2006). Decoupling the direct and indirect effects of nitrogen deposition on ecosystem function. Ecology Letters, 9(9), 1015-1024. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1461-0248.2006.00959.x

Vancouver

Manning P, Newington JE, Robson HR, Saunders M, Eggers T, Bradford MA et al. Decoupling the direct and indirect effects of nitrogen deposition on ecosystem function. Ecology Letters. 2006 Sep;9(9):1015-1024. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1461-0248.2006.00959.x

Author

Manning, Pete ; Newington, John E. ; Robson, Helen R. ; Saunders, Mark ; Eggers, Till ; Bradford, Mark A. ; Bardgett, Richard D. ; Bonkowski, Michael ; Ellis, Richard J. ; Gange, Alan C. ; Grayston, Susan J. ; Kandeler, Ellen ; Marhan, Sven ; Reid, Eileen ; Tscherko, Dagmar ; Godfray, H. Charles J. ; Rees, Mark. / Decoupling the direct and indirect effects of nitrogen deposition on ecosystem function. In: Ecology Letters. 2006 ; Vol. 9, No. 9. pp. 1015-1024.

Bibtex

@article{14b1924e85504ff69ffff9d6edf2c655,
title = "Decoupling the direct and indirect effects of nitrogen deposition on ecosystem function.",
abstract = "Elevated nitrogen (N) inputs into terrestrial ecosystems are causing major changes to the composition and functioning of ecosystems. Understanding these changes is challenging because there are complex interactions between 'direct' effects of N on plant physiology and soil biogeochemistry, and 'indirect' effects caused by changes in plant species composition. By planting high N and low N plant community compositions into high and low N deposition model terrestrial ecosystems we experimentally decoupled direct and indirect effects and quantified their contribution to changes in carbon, N and water cycling. Our results show that direct effects on plant growth dominate ecosystem response to N deposition, although long-term carbon storage is reduced under high N plant-species composition. These findings suggest that direct effects of N deposition on ecosystem function could be relatively strong in comparison with the indirect effects of plant community change.",
keywords = "Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi • biodiversity • evapotranspiration • frequency dependence • mineral-associated carbon • mineralization • net ecosystem productivity • plant community composition • soil decomposer community • soil enzyme activity",
author = "Pete Manning and Newington, {John E.} and Robson, {Helen R.} and Mark Saunders and Till Eggers and Bradford, {Mark A.} and Bardgett, {Richard D.} and Michael Bonkowski and Ellis, {Richard J.} and Gange, {Alan C.} and Grayston, {Susan J.} and Ellen Kandeler and Sven Marhan and Eileen Reid and Dagmar Tscherko and Godfray, {H. Charles J.} and Mark Rees",
year = "2006",
month = sep,
doi = "10.1111/j.1461-0248.2006.00959.x",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
pages = "1015--1024",
journal = "Ecology Letters",
issn = "1461-023X",
publisher = "Wiley",
number = "9",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Decoupling the direct and indirect effects of nitrogen deposition on ecosystem function.

AU - Manning, Pete

AU - Newington, John E.

AU - Robson, Helen R.

AU - Saunders, Mark

AU - Eggers, Till

AU - Bradford, Mark A.

AU - Bardgett, Richard D.

AU - Bonkowski, Michael

AU - Ellis, Richard J.

AU - Gange, Alan C.

AU - Grayston, Susan J.

AU - Kandeler, Ellen

AU - Marhan, Sven

AU - Reid, Eileen

AU - Tscherko, Dagmar

AU - Godfray, H. Charles J.

AU - Rees, Mark

PY - 2006/9

Y1 - 2006/9

N2 - Elevated nitrogen (N) inputs into terrestrial ecosystems are causing major changes to the composition and functioning of ecosystems. Understanding these changes is challenging because there are complex interactions between 'direct' effects of N on plant physiology and soil biogeochemistry, and 'indirect' effects caused by changes in plant species composition. By planting high N and low N plant community compositions into high and low N deposition model terrestrial ecosystems we experimentally decoupled direct and indirect effects and quantified their contribution to changes in carbon, N and water cycling. Our results show that direct effects on plant growth dominate ecosystem response to N deposition, although long-term carbon storage is reduced under high N plant-species composition. These findings suggest that direct effects of N deposition on ecosystem function could be relatively strong in comparison with the indirect effects of plant community change.

AB - Elevated nitrogen (N) inputs into terrestrial ecosystems are causing major changes to the composition and functioning of ecosystems. Understanding these changes is challenging because there are complex interactions between 'direct' effects of N on plant physiology and soil biogeochemistry, and 'indirect' effects caused by changes in plant species composition. By planting high N and low N plant community compositions into high and low N deposition model terrestrial ecosystems we experimentally decoupled direct and indirect effects and quantified their contribution to changes in carbon, N and water cycling. Our results show that direct effects on plant growth dominate ecosystem response to N deposition, although long-term carbon storage is reduced under high N plant-species composition. These findings suggest that direct effects of N deposition on ecosystem function could be relatively strong in comparison with the indirect effects of plant community change.

KW - Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi • biodiversity • evapotranspiration • frequency dependence • mineral-associated carbon • mineralization • net ecosystem productivity • plant community composition • soil decomposer community • soil enzyme activity

U2 - 10.1111/j.1461-0248.2006.00959.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1461-0248.2006.00959.x

M3 - Journal article

VL - 9

SP - 1015

EP - 1024

JO - Ecology Letters

JF - Ecology Letters

SN - 1461-023X

IS - 9

ER -