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Do extreme beliefs about internal states predict mood swings in an analogue sample?

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Do extreme beliefs about internal states predict mood swings in an analogue sample? / Dodd, Alyson; Mansell, Warren; Bentall, Richard P. et al.

In: Cognitive Therapy and Research, Vol. 35, No. 6, 2011, p. 497-504.

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Dodd, A, Mansell, W, Bentall, RP & Tai, S 2011, 'Do extreme beliefs about internal states predict mood swings in an analogue sample?', Cognitive Therapy and Research, vol. 35, no. 6, pp. 497-504. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10608-010-9342-y

APA

Dodd, A., Mansell, W., Bentall, R. P., & Tai, S. (2011). Do extreme beliefs about internal states predict mood swings in an analogue sample? Cognitive Therapy and Research, 35(6), 497-504. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10608-010-9342-y

Vancouver

Dodd A, Mansell W, Bentall RP, Tai S. Do extreme beliefs about internal states predict mood swings in an analogue sample? Cognitive Therapy and Research. 2011;35(6):497-504. doi: 10.1007/s10608-010-9342-y

Author

Dodd, Alyson ; Mansell, Warren ; Bentall, Richard P. et al. / Do extreme beliefs about internal states predict mood swings in an analogue sample?. In: Cognitive Therapy and Research. 2011 ; Vol. 35, No. 6. pp. 497-504.

Bibtex

@article{a170a6ceba424585aaa5e729223fbb01,
title = "Do extreme beliefs about internal states predict mood swings in an analogue sample?",
abstract = "An integrative cognitive model (Mansell et al. in Behav Cogn Psychother 35(5):515–539, 2007) proposed that multiple, extreme, personalised beliefs about internal states are key to the development and maintenance of moodswings and bipolar disorders. These beliefs can be assessedby the Hypomanic Attitudes & Positive Predictions Inventory (HAPPI; Mansell in Behav Cogn Psychother 34:467–476, 2006). In a student sample (N = 175), theHAPPI independently predicted bipolar-relevant mood states and hypomania-relevant behaviours over a 4-day period. In line with previous research, the Hypomanic Personality Scale (HYP; Eckblad and Chapman in J Abnorm Psychol 95(3):214–222, 1986) and subscales of the Behavioural Inhibition and Behavioural Activation Scales (BIS/BAS; Carver and White in J Pers Soc Psychol67(2):319–333, 1994) showed independent associations with outcome variables. The findings are discussed in the context of Mansell et al{\textquoteright}s (Behav Cogn Psychother 35(5):515–539, 2007) model.",
keywords = "Cognitive appraisals , Hypomanic personality , Behavioural activation , Hypomania, Depression ",
author = "Alyson Dodd and Warren Mansell and Bentall, {Richard P.} and Sara Tai",
year = "2011",
doi = "10.1007/s10608-010-9342-y",
language = "English",
volume = "35",
pages = "497--504",
journal = "Cognitive Therapy and Research",
issn = "0147-5916",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Do extreme beliefs about internal states predict mood swings in an analogue sample?

AU - Dodd, Alyson

AU - Mansell, Warren

AU - Bentall, Richard P.

AU - Tai, Sara

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - An integrative cognitive model (Mansell et al. in Behav Cogn Psychother 35(5):515–539, 2007) proposed that multiple, extreme, personalised beliefs about internal states are key to the development and maintenance of moodswings and bipolar disorders. These beliefs can be assessedby the Hypomanic Attitudes & Positive Predictions Inventory (HAPPI; Mansell in Behav Cogn Psychother 34:467–476, 2006). In a student sample (N = 175), theHAPPI independently predicted bipolar-relevant mood states and hypomania-relevant behaviours over a 4-day period. In line with previous research, the Hypomanic Personality Scale (HYP; Eckblad and Chapman in J Abnorm Psychol 95(3):214–222, 1986) and subscales of the Behavioural Inhibition and Behavioural Activation Scales (BIS/BAS; Carver and White in J Pers Soc Psychol67(2):319–333, 1994) showed independent associations with outcome variables. The findings are discussed in the context of Mansell et al’s (Behav Cogn Psychother 35(5):515–539, 2007) model.

AB - An integrative cognitive model (Mansell et al. in Behav Cogn Psychother 35(5):515–539, 2007) proposed that multiple, extreme, personalised beliefs about internal states are key to the development and maintenance of moodswings and bipolar disorders. These beliefs can be assessedby the Hypomanic Attitudes & Positive Predictions Inventory (HAPPI; Mansell in Behav Cogn Psychother 34:467–476, 2006). In a student sample (N = 175), theHAPPI independently predicted bipolar-relevant mood states and hypomania-relevant behaviours over a 4-day period. In line with previous research, the Hypomanic Personality Scale (HYP; Eckblad and Chapman in J Abnorm Psychol 95(3):214–222, 1986) and subscales of the Behavioural Inhibition and Behavioural Activation Scales (BIS/BAS; Carver and White in J Pers Soc Psychol67(2):319–333, 1994) showed independent associations with outcome variables. The findings are discussed in the context of Mansell et al’s (Behav Cogn Psychother 35(5):515–539, 2007) model.

KW - Cognitive appraisals

KW - Hypomanic personality

KW - Behavioural activation

KW - Hypomania

KW - Depression

U2 - 10.1007/s10608-010-9342-y

DO - 10.1007/s10608-010-9342-y

M3 - Journal article

VL - 35

SP - 497

EP - 504

JO - Cognitive Therapy and Research

JF - Cognitive Therapy and Research

SN - 0147-5916

IS - 6

ER -