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    Rights statement: Corrected version. Mariusz Slabicki found a bug in the simulator, whereby previously collided packets would be in some cases marked as `not collided', thereby overestimating the goodput of the network. The bug was fixed and all figures and numbers have been updated accordingly. The overal conclusions, however, stays the same.

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Do LoRa low-power wide-area networks scale?

Research output: Contribution in Book/Report/Proceedings - With ISBN/ISSNConference contribution/Paperpeer-review

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Do LoRa low-power wide-area networks scale? / Bor, Martin; Roedig, Utz; Voigt, Thiemo; Alonso, Juan.

MSWiM '16 Proceedings of the 19th ACM International Conference on Modeling, Analysis and Simulation of Wireless and Mobile Systems. New York : ACM Press, 2016. p. 59-67.

Research output: Contribution in Book/Report/Proceedings - With ISBN/ISSNConference contribution/Paperpeer-review

Harvard

Bor, M, Roedig, U, Voigt, T & Alonso, J 2016, Do LoRa low-power wide-area networks scale? in MSWiM '16 Proceedings of the 19th ACM International Conference on Modeling, Analysis and Simulation of Wireless and Mobile Systems. ACM Press, New York, pp. 59-67. https://doi.org/10.1145/2988287.2989163

APA

Bor, M., Roedig, U., Voigt, T., & Alonso, J. (2016). Do LoRa low-power wide-area networks scale? In MSWiM '16 Proceedings of the 19th ACM International Conference on Modeling, Analysis and Simulation of Wireless and Mobile Systems (pp. 59-67). ACM Press. https://doi.org/10.1145/2988287.2989163

Vancouver

Bor M, Roedig U, Voigt T, Alonso J. Do LoRa low-power wide-area networks scale? In MSWiM '16 Proceedings of the 19th ACM International Conference on Modeling, Analysis and Simulation of Wireless and Mobile Systems. New York: ACM Press. 2016. p. 59-67 https://doi.org/10.1145/2988287.2989163

Author

Bor, Martin ; Roedig, Utz ; Voigt, Thiemo ; Alonso, Juan. / Do LoRa low-power wide-area networks scale?. MSWiM '16 Proceedings of the 19th ACM International Conference on Modeling, Analysis and Simulation of Wireless and Mobile Systems. New York : ACM Press, 2016. pp. 59-67

Bibtex

@inproceedings{83d93e9d8d7749278f9ccdca397fe355,
title = "Do LoRa low-power wide-area networks scale?",
abstract = "New Internet of Things (IoT) technologies such as Long Range (LoRa) are emerging which enable power efficient wireless communication over very long distances. Devices typically communicate directly to a sink node which removes the need of constructing and maintaining a complex multi-hop network. Given the fact that a wide area is covered and that all devices communicate directly to a few sink nodes a large number of nodes have to share the communication medium. LoRa provides for this reason a range of communication options (centre frequency, spreading factor, bandwidth, coding rates) from which a transmitter can choose. Many combination settings are orthogonal and provide simultaneous collision free communications. Nevertheless, there is a limit regarding the number of transmitters a LoRa system can support. In this paper we investigate the capacity limits of LoRa networks. Using experiments we develop models describing LoRa communication behaviour. We use these models to parameterise a LoRa simulation to study scalability. Our experiments show that a typical smart city deployment can support 120 nodes per 3.8 ha, which is not sufficient for future IoT deployments. LoRa networks can scale quite well, however, if they use dynamic communication parameter selection and/or multiple sinks.",
keywords = "LoRa, Low-Power Wide-Area Network, Scalability Analysis",
author = "Martin Bor and Utz Roedig and Thiemo Voigt and Juan Alonso",
note = "A Corrected version. A bug was found in the simulator, whereby previously collided packets would be in some cases marked as {\textquoteleft}not collided{\textquoteright}, thereby overestimating the goodput of the network. The bug was fixed and all figures and numbers have been updated accordingly. The overall conclusions, however, has stayed the same.",
year = "2016",
month = nov,
day = "14",
doi = "10.1145/2988287.2989163",
language = "English",
pages = "59--67",
booktitle = "MSWiM '16 Proceedings of the 19th ACM International Conference on Modeling, Analysis and Simulation of Wireless and Mobile Systems",
publisher = "ACM Press",

}

RIS

TY - GEN

T1 - Do LoRa low-power wide-area networks scale?

AU - Bor, Martin

AU - Roedig, Utz

AU - Voigt, Thiemo

AU - Alonso, Juan

N1 - A Corrected version. A bug was found in the simulator, whereby previously collided packets would be in some cases marked as ‘not collided’, thereby overestimating the goodput of the network. The bug was fixed and all figures and numbers have been updated accordingly. The overall conclusions, however, has stayed the same.

PY - 2016/11/14

Y1 - 2016/11/14

N2 - New Internet of Things (IoT) technologies such as Long Range (LoRa) are emerging which enable power efficient wireless communication over very long distances. Devices typically communicate directly to a sink node which removes the need of constructing and maintaining a complex multi-hop network. Given the fact that a wide area is covered and that all devices communicate directly to a few sink nodes a large number of nodes have to share the communication medium. LoRa provides for this reason a range of communication options (centre frequency, spreading factor, bandwidth, coding rates) from which a transmitter can choose. Many combination settings are orthogonal and provide simultaneous collision free communications. Nevertheless, there is a limit regarding the number of transmitters a LoRa system can support. In this paper we investigate the capacity limits of LoRa networks. Using experiments we develop models describing LoRa communication behaviour. We use these models to parameterise a LoRa simulation to study scalability. Our experiments show that a typical smart city deployment can support 120 nodes per 3.8 ha, which is not sufficient for future IoT deployments. LoRa networks can scale quite well, however, if they use dynamic communication parameter selection and/or multiple sinks.

AB - New Internet of Things (IoT) technologies such as Long Range (LoRa) are emerging which enable power efficient wireless communication over very long distances. Devices typically communicate directly to a sink node which removes the need of constructing and maintaining a complex multi-hop network. Given the fact that a wide area is covered and that all devices communicate directly to a few sink nodes a large number of nodes have to share the communication medium. LoRa provides for this reason a range of communication options (centre frequency, spreading factor, bandwidth, coding rates) from which a transmitter can choose. Many combination settings are orthogonal and provide simultaneous collision free communications. Nevertheless, there is a limit regarding the number of transmitters a LoRa system can support. In this paper we investigate the capacity limits of LoRa networks. Using experiments we develop models describing LoRa communication behaviour. We use these models to parameterise a LoRa simulation to study scalability. Our experiments show that a typical smart city deployment can support 120 nodes per 3.8 ha, which is not sufficient for future IoT deployments. LoRa networks can scale quite well, however, if they use dynamic communication parameter selection and/or multiple sinks.

KW - LoRa

KW - Low-Power Wide-Area Network

KW - Scalability Analysis

U2 - 10.1145/2988287.2989163

DO - 10.1145/2988287.2989163

M3 - Conference contribution/Paper

SP - 59

EP - 67

BT - MSWiM '16 Proceedings of the 19th ACM International Conference on Modeling, Analysis and Simulation of Wireless and Mobile Systems

PB - ACM Press

CY - New York

ER -