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Dynamics of mild strombolian activity on Mt. Etna

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Dynamics of mild strombolian activity on Mt. Etna. / Pering, T.D.; Tamburello, G.; McGonigle, A.J.S.; Aiuppa, A.; James, Michael; Lane, Steve J.; Sciotto, M.; Cannata, A.; Patanè, D.

In: Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, Vol. 300, 07.2015, p. 103-111.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Pering, TD, Tamburello, G, McGonigle, AJS, Aiuppa, A, James, M, Lane, SJ, Sciotto, M, Cannata, A & Patanè, D 2015, 'Dynamics of mild strombolian activity on Mt. Etna', Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, vol. 300, pp. 103-111. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2014.12.013

APA

Pering, T. D., Tamburello, G., McGonigle, A. J. S., Aiuppa, A., James, M., Lane, S. J., Sciotto, M., Cannata, A., & Patanè, D. (2015). Dynamics of mild strombolian activity on Mt. Etna. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 300, 103-111. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2014.12.013

Vancouver

Pering TD, Tamburello G, McGonigle AJS, Aiuppa A, James M, Lane SJ et al. Dynamics of mild strombolian activity on Mt. Etna. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research. 2015 Jul;300:103-111. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2014.12.013

Author

Pering, T.D. ; Tamburello, G. ; McGonigle, A.J.S. ; Aiuppa, A. ; James, Michael ; Lane, Steve J. ; Sciotto, M. ; Cannata, A. ; Patanè, D. / Dynamics of mild strombolian activity on Mt. Etna. In: Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research. 2015 ; Vol. 300. pp. 103-111.

Bibtex

@article{39a1d3c4dfb3463abd28b3fe8fdbf88c,
title = "Dynamics of mild strombolian activity on Mt. Etna",
abstract = "Here we report the first measurements of gas masses released during a rare period of strombolian activity at the Bocca Nuova crater, Mt. Etna, Sicily. UV camera data acquired for 195 events over an ≈27 minute period (27th July 2012) indicate erupted SO2 masses ranging from ≈0.1 to ≈14 kg per event, with corresponding total gas masses of ≈0.1 to 74 kg. Thus, the activity was characterised by more frequent and smaller events than typically associated with strombolian activity on volcanoes such as Stromboli. Events releasing larger measured gas masses were followed by relatively long repose periods before the following burst, a feature not previously reported on from gas measurement data. If we assume that gas transport within the magma can be represented by a train of rising gas pockets or slugs, then the high frequency of events indicates that these slugs must have been in close proximity. In this case the longer repose durations associated with the larger slugs would be consistent with interactions between adjacent slugs leading to coalescence, a process expedited close to the surface by rapid slug expansion. We apply basic modelling considerations to the measured gas masses in order to investigate potential slug characteristics overning the observed activity.We also cross correlated the acquired gas fluxes with contemporaneously obtained seismic data but found no relationship betweenthe series in line with the mild form of manifest explosivity.",
keywords = "Mild strombolian activity, Ultra-violet imaging, Volcanic gas measurements, Slug dynamics, Coalescence, Trailing wake interaction",
author = "T.D. Pering and G. Tamburello and A.J.S. McGonigle and A. Aiuppa and Michael James and Lane, {Steve J.} and M. Sciotto and A. Cannata and D. Patan{\`e}",
year = "2015",
month = jul,
doi = "10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2014.12.013",
language = "English",
volume = "300",
pages = "103--111",
journal = "Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research",
issn = "0377-0273",
publisher = "Elsevier Science B.V.",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dynamics of mild strombolian activity on Mt. Etna

AU - Pering, T.D.

AU - Tamburello, G.

AU - McGonigle, A.J.S.

AU - Aiuppa, A.

AU - James, Michael

AU - Lane, Steve J.

AU - Sciotto, M.

AU - Cannata, A.

AU - Patanè, D.

PY - 2015/7

Y1 - 2015/7

N2 - Here we report the first measurements of gas masses released during a rare period of strombolian activity at the Bocca Nuova crater, Mt. Etna, Sicily. UV camera data acquired for 195 events over an ≈27 minute period (27th July 2012) indicate erupted SO2 masses ranging from ≈0.1 to ≈14 kg per event, with corresponding total gas masses of ≈0.1 to 74 kg. Thus, the activity was characterised by more frequent and smaller events than typically associated with strombolian activity on volcanoes such as Stromboli. Events releasing larger measured gas masses were followed by relatively long repose periods before the following burst, a feature not previously reported on from gas measurement data. If we assume that gas transport within the magma can be represented by a train of rising gas pockets or slugs, then the high frequency of events indicates that these slugs must have been in close proximity. In this case the longer repose durations associated with the larger slugs would be consistent with interactions between adjacent slugs leading to coalescence, a process expedited close to the surface by rapid slug expansion. We apply basic modelling considerations to the measured gas masses in order to investigate potential slug characteristics overning the observed activity.We also cross correlated the acquired gas fluxes with contemporaneously obtained seismic data but found no relationship betweenthe series in line with the mild form of manifest explosivity.

AB - Here we report the first measurements of gas masses released during a rare period of strombolian activity at the Bocca Nuova crater, Mt. Etna, Sicily. UV camera data acquired for 195 events over an ≈27 minute period (27th July 2012) indicate erupted SO2 masses ranging from ≈0.1 to ≈14 kg per event, with corresponding total gas masses of ≈0.1 to 74 kg. Thus, the activity was characterised by more frequent and smaller events than typically associated with strombolian activity on volcanoes such as Stromboli. Events releasing larger measured gas masses were followed by relatively long repose periods before the following burst, a feature not previously reported on from gas measurement data. If we assume that gas transport within the magma can be represented by a train of rising gas pockets or slugs, then the high frequency of events indicates that these slugs must have been in close proximity. In this case the longer repose durations associated with the larger slugs would be consistent with interactions between adjacent slugs leading to coalescence, a process expedited close to the surface by rapid slug expansion. We apply basic modelling considerations to the measured gas masses in order to investigate potential slug characteristics overning the observed activity.We also cross correlated the acquired gas fluxes with contemporaneously obtained seismic data but found no relationship betweenthe series in line with the mild form of manifest explosivity.

KW - Mild strombolian activity

KW - Ultra-violet imaging

KW - Volcanic gas measurements

KW - Slug dynamics

KW - Coalescence

KW - Trailing wake interaction

U2 - 10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2014.12.013

DO - 10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2014.12.013

M3 - Journal article

VL - 300

SP - 103

EP - 111

JO - Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research

JF - Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research

SN - 0377-0273

ER -