Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Economic relationships and health inequalities

Electronic data

  • Econ Rel and Health Inequalities Final submission

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Public Health. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Public Health, 199, 2021 DOI: 10.1016/j.puhe.2021.08.017

    Accepted author manuscript, 120 KB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 25/09/22

    Available under license: CC BY-NC-ND

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Economic relationships and health inequalities: improving public health recommendations

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>31/10/2021
<mark>Journal</mark>Public Health
Volume199
Number of pages4
Pages (from-to)103-106
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date25/09/21
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Policy recommendations, which aim to reduce health inequalities in society, often focus upon improving the incomes, working conditions and physical environments of the most deprived groups. We agree with these recommendations but argue that they are insufficient to reduce health inequalities because they fail to address the economic relationships between social groups that lead to health inequalities and which perpetuate them over time. A comprehensive programme to reduce health inequalities will require policies that address the numerous ways in which economic resources flow from poorer groups to richer groups through the design of the economy. In this commentary we describe key economic relationships between social groups that lead to inequalities, namely rent, interest, capital gains, profit, monopoly and speculation. Addressing these causes of economic inequality in recommendations to reduce health inequalities should be considered by future research in this area.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Public Health. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Public Health, 199, 2021 DOI: 10.1016/j.puhe.2021.08.017